Doctors Criticize Fauci For Saying COVID Vaccines Induce ‘Only Temporary’ Menstrual Irregularities

Authors: Enrico Trigozo Epoch Times August 6, 2022

Dr. Anthony Fauci’s recent comments on menstrual irregularities met with serious rebuttal from gynecologists, who say COVID-19 vaccines should not have been injected into pregnant women without adequate safety testing.

Well, the menstrual thing is something that seems to be quite transient and temporary, that’s one of the points,” Fauci said in an appearance on Fox News on July 25, upon being asked about the effect of vaccines on menstrual cycles.

“We need to study it more,” Fauci added.

Fauci is the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and has been a frontman for COVID vaccine information in the United States.

Dr. Christiane Northrup MD, a former fellow in the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, remarked to The Epoch Times on Fauci’s comments: “Unfortunately the menstrual problems we are seeing are far from transient and temporary. Many women have been bleeding daily or having heavy, irregular, painful periods for an entire year. And some of these are well past menopause. Something is way off here. ”

Dr. James Thorp is an extensively published 69-year-old physician MD board-certified in obstetrics and gynecology, as well as maternal-fetal medicine, who has been practicing obstetrics for over 42 years.

The significant and dramatic changes in menstrual patterns occurring after COVID-19 vaccines should not be marginalized. It is indicative of major adverse effects on women of reproductive age. The stakeholders claimed that the vaccine would remain at the injection site in the deltoid muscle. This was misinformation. The lipid nanoparticles (LNP’s) are now known to be distributed throughout the entire body and to be concentrated in the ovaries, according to at least two studies. Schadlich and colleagues demonstrated concentration of the LNP’s in ovaries of different mouse species and Wistar rats, in vivo, in vitro and by sophisticated microscopic imaging in 2012,” he told The Epoch Times.

A lipid nanoparticle is an extremely small particle, a fat-soluble membrane that is the cargo of the messenger RNA.

Pfizer’s Internal Documents

Pfizer’s internal documents, obtained via the Freedom of Information Act, show a 118-fold increase in the concentration of LNPs from the time of injection to 48 hours.

“The LNP’s are known to include toxic substances including polyethylene glycol and pseudo-uridinated mRNA. The limited number of ovum in the ovaries (about 1 million) are exposed to potentially toxic substances and could potentially have catastrophic effects on human reproduction,” Thorp said.  

The stakeholders claimed that the pseudo-uridinated mRNA could not be reverse transcribed into the human DNA. This was misinformation,” he added, referring to a Swedish study published in February 2022 that concluded that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine is able to enter human liver cells and is converted into DNA.

Thorp and former Pfizer VP Michael Yeadon believe that the medical industrial complex had unequivocal evidence on the vaccine’s danger in pregnant women.

This is proven not only by VAERS but also by Pfizer’s own internal document ‘Pfizer 5.3.6 post-marketing experience” Thorp said.

Within the first 90 days of trials, there were 1,223 deaths, multiple severe adverse effects, and a 45 percent complication rate in pregnancy cases (274) that occurred in vaccinated mothers (124).

The 2012 study, mentioned by Thorp earlier, says that after testing with different mouse species and Wistar rats, “a high local accumulation of nanoparticles, nanocapsules and nanoemulsions in specific locations of the ovaries was found in all animals.”

Yeadon believes that the pharmaceutical industry “definitely knew,” since 2012, that the lipid nanoparticles would accumulate in the ovaries of women that took the vaccines.

“No one in the industry or in leading media could claim ‘they didn’t know about these risks to successful pregnancy,’” Yeadon told The Epoch Times in April.

Prevalence of organ impairment in Long COVID patients 6 and 12 months after initial symptoms

Authors:  Pooja Toshniwal PahariaMar 24 2022Reviewed by Danielle Ellis, B.Sc.

In a recent study posted to the medRxiv* preprint server, researchers assessed the prevalence of organ impairment in long coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) six months and a year post-COVID-19 at London and Oxford.

Multi-organ impairment associated with long COVID-19 is a significant health burden. Standardized multi-organ evaluation is deficient, especially in non-hospitalized patients. Although the symptoms of long COVID-19, also known as post-acute sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC), are well-established, the natural history is poorly classified by symptoms, organ impairment, and function.

About the study

In the present prospective study, researchers assessed organ impairment in long COVID-19 patients six months and a year after the onset of early symptoms and correlated them to their clinical presentation.

The participants were recruited based on specialist referral or the response to advertisements in sites such as Mayo Clinic Healthcare, Perspectum, and Oxford from April 2020 to August 2021, based on their COVID-19 history.

The study was conducted on COVID-19 patients who recovered from the acute phase of the infection. Their health status, symptoms, and organ impairment were assessed. The symptoms assessed comprised cardiopulmonary, severe dyspnoea, and cognitive dysfunction. Biochemical and physiological parameters were analyzed at baseline and post-organ impairment. The radiological investigation comprised multi-organ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed in the long COVID-19 patients and healthy controls.

Over a year, the team prospectively investigated the symptoms, organ impairment, and function, especially dyspnea, cognitive dysfunction, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). They also evaluated the association between organ impairment and clinical symptoms.

Patients with symptoms of active pulmonary infections (body temperature >37.8°C or ≥3 coughing episodes in a day) and hospital discharges in the previous week or >4 months were excluded from the study. Asymptomatic patients and those with MRI contraindications such as defibrillators, pacemakers, devices with metal implants, and claustrophobia were removed.

Participants with impaired organs, as diagnosed by blood investigations, incidental findings, or MRI, were included in the follow-up assessments. Every visit comprised blood investigations, MRI scanning, and online questionnaire surveys, which were to be filled out beforehand. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was performed that excluded patients at risk of metabolic disorders (including body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2, diabetes, and hypertension)

Results

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Out of 536 participants, the majority were middle-aged (mean age 45 years), female (73%), White (89%), and healthcare workers (32%). About 13% of the COVID-19 patients hospitalized during the acute phase of the infection completed the baseline evaluation. A total of 331 patients (62%) had incidental findings, organ impairment, or reduction in the symptoms from the baseline at both the time points.

Cognitive dysfunction (50% and 38%), poor HRQoL (EuroQOL <0.7 in 55% and 45%), and severe dyspnea (36% and 30%) were observed at six months and one year, respectively. On follow-up, the symptoms were reduced, especially cardiopulmonary and systemic symptoms, whereas fatigue, dyspnea, and cognitive dysfunction were consistently present. The greatest impact on quality of life was related to pain and difficulties performing routine activities. Almost every patient took time off work due to COVID-19. The symptoms were largely associated with obese women, young age, and impairment of a single organ.

At baseline, fibrous inflammation was observed in the pancreas (9%), heart (9%), liver (11%), and kidney (15%). Additionally, increased volumes of the spleen (8%), kidney (9%), and liver (7%) were observed. Moreover, reduced lung capacity (2%), excess adipose deposits in pancreatic tissues (15%) and liver (25%) were observed. High liver fibro-inflammation was associated with cognitive dysfunction at follow-up in 19% and 12% of patients with and without cognitive dysfunction, respectively. Low liver fat was more likely in those without severe dyspnoea at both time points. Increased liver volumes at follow-up were associated with lower HRQoL scores.

The prevalence of multi and single-organ impairment was 23% and 59% at baseline, respectively, and persisted in 27% and 59% of the participants on follow-up assessments. Most of the organ impairments were mild. However, they did not improve substantially between visits. Notably, participants without organ impairment had the lowest symptom burden.

Most biochemical parameters were normal except creatinine kinase (8% and 13%), lactate dehydrogenase (16% and 22%), mean cell hemoglobin concentration (21% and 15%), and cholesterol (46% and 48%), at six months and a year post-COVID-19, respectively. These biochemical markers increased from the baseline on follow-up assessments.

Conclusion

To summarize, organ impairment was detected in 59% of the patients at six months post-COVID-19 and persisted in 59% at one-year follow-up. This has significant implications on the quality of life, symptoms, and long-term health of the patients. These observations highlight the requirement for enhanced preventive measures and integrated patient care to decrease the long COVID-19 burden.

Journal reference:

Intracellular Reverse Transcription of Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine BNT162b2 In Vitro in Human Liver Cell Line

Authors:  Markus Aldén 1,Francisko Olofsson Falla 1,Daowei Yang 1,Mohammad Barghouth 1,Cheng Luan 1,Magnus Rasmussen 2 andYang De Marinis 1,*1Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, 20502 Malmö, Sweden2Infection Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, 22362 Lund, Sweden

Abstract

Preclinical studies of COVID-19 mRNA vaccine BNT162b2, developed by Pfizer and BioNTech, showed reversible hepatic effects in animals that received the BNT162b2 injection. Furthermore, a recent study showed that SARS-CoV-2 RNA can be reverse-transcribed and integrated into the genome of human cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of BNT162b2 on the human liver cell line Huh7 in vitro. Huh7 cells were exposed to BNT162b2, and quantitative PCR was performed on RNA extracted from the cells. We detected high levels of BNT162b2 in Huh7 cells and changes in gene expression of long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1), which is an endogenous reverse transcriptase. Immunohistochemistry using antibody binding to LINE-1 open reading frame-1 RNA-binding protein (ORFp1) on Huh7 cells treated with BNT162b2 indicated increased nucleus distribution of LINE-1. PCR on genomic DNA of Huh7 cells exposed to BNT162b2 amplified the DNA sequence unique to BNT162b2. Our results indicate a fast up-take of BNT162b2 into human liver cell line Huh7, leading to changes in LINE-1 expression and distribution. We also show that BNT162b2 mRNA is reverse transcribed intracellularly into DNA in as fast as 6 h upon BNT162b2 exposure.

1. Introduction

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was announced by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a global pandemic on 11 March 2020, and it emerged as a devasting health crisis. As of February 2022, COVID-19 has led to over 430 million reported infection cases and 5.9 million deaths worldwide [1]. Effective and safe vaccines are urgently needed to reduce the morbidity and mortality rates associated with COVID-19.Several vaccines for COVID-19 have been developed, with particular focus on mRNA vaccines (by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna), replication-defective recombinant adenoviral vector vaccines (by Janssen-Johnson and Johnson, Astra-Zeneca, Sputnik-V, and CanSino), and inactivated vaccines (by Sinopharm, Bharat Biotech and Sinovac). The mRNA vaccine has the advantages of being flexible and efficient in immunogen design and manufacturing, and currently, numerous vaccine candidates are in various stages of development and application. Specifically, COVID-19 mRNA vaccine BNT162b2 developed by Pfizer and BioNTech has been evaluated in successful clinical trials [2,3,4] and administered in national COVID-19 vaccination campaigns in different regions around the world [5,6,7,8].BNT162b2 is a lipid nanoparticle (LNP)–encapsulated, nucleoside-modified RNA vaccine (modRNA) and encodes the full-length of SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein, modified by two proline mutations to ensure antigenically optimal pre-fusion conformation, which mimics the intact virus to elicit virus-neutralizing antibodies [3]. Consistent with randomized clinical trials, BNT162b2 showed high efficiency in a wide range of COVID-19-related outcomes in a real-world setting [5]. Nevertheless, many challenges remain, including monitoring for long-term safety and efficacy of the vaccine. This warrants further evaluation and investigations. The safety profile of BNT162b2 is currently only available from short-term clinical studies. Less common adverse effects of BNT162b2 have been reported, including pericarditis, arrhythmia, deep-vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, intracranial hemorrhage, and thrombocytopenia [4,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20]. There are also studies that report adverse effects observed in other types of vaccines [21,22,23,24]. To better understand mechanisms underlying vaccine-related adverse effects, clinical investigations as well as cellular and molecular analyses are needed.A recent study showed that SARS-CoV-2 RNAs can be reverse-transcribed and integrated into the genome of human cells [25]. This gives rise to the question of if this may also occur with BNT162b2, which encodes partial SARS-CoV-2 RNA. In pharmacokinetics data provided by Pfizer to European Medicines Agency (EMA), BNT162b2 biodistribution was studied in mice and rats by intra-muscular injection with radiolabeled LNP and luciferase modRNA. Radioactivity was detected in most tissues from the first time point (0.25 h), and results showed that the injection site and the liver were the major sites of distribution, with maximum concentrations observed at 8–48 h post-dose [26]. Furthermore, in animals that received the BNT162b2 injection, reversible hepatic effects were observed, including enlarged liver, vacuolation, increased gamma glutamyl transferase (γGT) levels, and increased levels of aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) [26]. Transient hepatic effects induced by LNP delivery systems have been reported previously [27,28,29,30], nevertheless, it has also been shown that the empty LNP without modRNA alone does not introduce any significant liver injury [27]. Therefore, in this study, we aim to examine the effect of BNT162b2 on a human liver cell line in vitro and investigate if BNT162b2 can be reverse transcribed into DNA through endogenous mechanisms.

2. Materials and Methods

2.1. Cell Culture

Huh7 cells (JCRB Cell Bank, Osaka, Japan) were cultured in 37 °C at 5% CO2 with DMEM medium (HyClone, HYCLSH30243.01) supplemented with 10% (v/v) fetal bovine serum (Sigma-Aldrich, F7524-500ML, Burlington, MA, USA) and 1% (v/v) Penicillin-Streptomycin (HyClone, SV30010, Logan, UT, USA). For BNT162b2 treatment, Huh7 cells were seeded with a density of 200,000 cells/well in 24-well plates. BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine (Pfizer BioNTech, New York, NY, USA) was diluted with sterile 0.9% sodium chloride injection, USP into a final concentration of 100 μg/mL as described in the manufacturer’s guideline [31]. BNT162b2 suspension was then added in cell culture media to reach final concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 μg/mL. Huh7 cells were incubated with or without BNT162b2 for 6, 24, and 48 h. Cells were washed thoroughly with PBS and harvested by trypsinization and stored in −80 °C until further use.

2.2. REAL-TIME RT-QPCR

RNA from the cells was extracted with RNeasy Plus Mini Kit (Qiagen, 74134, Hilden, Germany) following the manufacturer’s protocol. RT-PCR was performed using RevertAid First Strand cDNA Synthesis kit (Thermo Fisher Scientific, K1622, Waltham, MA, USA) following the manufacturers protocol. Real-time qPCR was performed using Maxima SYBR Green/ROX qPCR Master Mix (Thermo Fisher Scientific, K0222, Waltham, MA, USA) with primers for BNT162b2, LINE-1 and housekeeping genes ACTB and GAPDH (Table 1).Table 1. Primer sequences of RT-qPCR and PCR.

Table

2.3. Immunofluorescence Staining and Confocal Imaging

Huh7 cells were cultured in eight-chamber slides (LAB-TEK, 154534, Santa Cruz, CA, USA) with a density of 40,000 cells/well, with or without BNT162b2 (0.5, 1 or 2 µg/mL) for 6 h. Immunohistochemistry was performed using primary antibody anti-LINE-1 ORF1p mouse monoclonal antibody (Merck, 3574308, Kenilworth, NJ, USA), secondary antibody Cy3 Donkey anti-mouse (Jackson ImmunoResearch, West Grove, PA, USA), and Hoechst (Life technologies, 34850, Carlsbad, CA, USA), following the protocol from Thermo Fisher (Waltham, MA, USA). Two images per condition were taken using a Zeiss LSM 800 and a 63X oil immersion objective, and the staining intensity was quantified on the individual whole cell area and the nucleus area on 15 cells per image by ImageJ 1.53c. LINE-1 staining intensity for the cytosol was calculated by subtracting the intensity of the nucleus from that of the whole cell. All images of the cells were assigned a random number to prevent bias. To mark the nuclei (determined by the Hoechst staining) and the whole cells (determined by the borders of the LINE-1 fluorescence), the Freehand selection tool was used. These areas were then measured, and the mean intensity was used to compare the groups.

2.4. Genomic DNA Purification, PCR Amplification, Agarose Gel Purification, and Sanger Sequencing

Genomic DNA was extracted from cell pellets with PBND buffer (10 mM Tris-HCl pH 8.3, 50 mM KCl, 2.5 mM MgCl2, 0.45% NP-40, 0.45% Tween-20) according to protocol described previously [32]. To remove residual RNA from the DNA preparation, RNase (100 µg/mL, Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) was added to the DNA preparation and incubated at 37 °C for 3 h, followed by 5 min at 95 °C. PCR was then performed using primers targeting BNT162b2 (sequences are shown in Table 1), with the following program: 5 min at 95 °C, 35 cycles of 95 °C for 30 s, 58 °C for 30 s, and 72 °C for 1 min; finally, 72 °C for 5 min and 12 °C for 5 min. PCR products were run on 1.4% (w/v) agarose gel. Bands corresponding to the amplicons of the expected size (444 bps) were cut out and DNA was extracted using QIAquick PCR Purification Kit (Qiagen, 28104, Hilden, Germany), following the manufacturer’s instructions. The sequence of the DNA amplicon was verified by Sanger sequencing (Eurofins Genomics, Ebersberg, Germany).

Statistics

Statistical comparisons were performed using two-tailed Student’s t-test and ANOVA. Data are expressed as the mean ± SEM or ± SD. Differences with p < 0.05 are considered significant.

2.5. Ethical Statements

The Huh7 cell line was obtained from Japanese Collection of Research Bioresources (JCRB) Cell Bank.

3. Results

3.1. BNT162b2 Enters Human Liver Cell Line Huh7 Cells at High Efficiency

To determine if BNT162b2 enters human liver cells, we exposed human liver cell line Huh7 to BNT162b2. In a previous study on the uptake kinetics of LNP delivery in Huh7 cells, the maximum biological efficacy of LNP was observed between 4–7 h [33]. Therefore, in our study, Huh7 cells were cultured with or without increasing concentrations of BNT162b2 (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 µg/mL) for 6, 24, and 48 h. RNA was extracted from cells and a real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was performed using primers targeting the BNT162b2 sequence, as illustrated in Figure 1. The full sequence of BNT162b2 is publicly available [34] and contains a two-nucleotides cap; 5′- untranslated region (UTR) that incorporates the 5′ -UTR of a human α-globin gene; the full-length of SARS-CoV-2 S protein with two proline mutations; 3′-UTR that incorporates the human mitochondrial 12S rRNA (mtRNR1) segment and human AES/TLE5 gene segment with two C→U mutations; poly(A) tail. Detailed analysis of the S protein sequence in BNT162b2 revealed 124 sequences that are 100% identical to human genomic sequences and three sequences with only one nucleotide (nt) mismatch in 19–26 nts (Table S1, see Supplementary Materials). To detect BNT162b2 RNA level, we designed primers with forward primer located in SARS-CoV-2 S protein regions and reverse primer in 3′-UTR, which allows detection of PCR amplicon unique to BNT162b2 without unspecific binding of the primers to human genomic regions.

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Figure 1. PCR primer set used to detect mRNA level and reverse-transcription of BNT162b2. Illustration of BNT162b2 was adapted from previously described literature [34].RT-qPCR results showed that Huh7 cells treated with BNT162b2 had high levels of BNT162b2 mRNA relative to housekeeping genes at 6, 24, and 48 h (Figure 2, presented in logged 2−ΔΔCT due to exceptionally high levels). The three BNT162b2 concentrations led to similar intracellular BNT162b2 mRNA levels at the different time points, except that the significant difference between 1.0 and 2.0 µg/mL was observed at 48 h. BNT162b2 mRNA levels were significantly decreased at 24 h compared to 6 h, but increased again at 48 h.

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Figure 2. BNT162b2 mRNA levels in Huh7 cells treated with BNT162b2. Huh7 cells were treated without (Ctrl) or with 0.5 (V1), 1 (V2), and 2 µg/mL (V3) of BNT162b2 for 6 (green dots), 24 (orange dots), and 48 h (blue dots). RNA was purified and qPCR was performed using primers targeting BNT162b2. RNA levels of BNT162b2 are presented as logged 2−ΔΔCT values relative to house-keeping genes GAPDH and ACTB. Results are from five independent experiments (n = 5). Differences between respective groups were analyzed using two-tailed Student’s t-test. Data are expressed as the mean ± SEM. (* p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; *** p < 0.001 vs. respective control at each time point, or as indicated).

3.2. Effect of BNT162b2 on Human Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 (LINE-1)

Here we examined the effect of BNT162b2 on LINE-1 gene expression. RT-qPCR was performed on RNA purified from Huh7 cells treated with BNT162b2 (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 µg/mL) for 6, 24, and 48 h, using primers targeting LINE-1. Significantly increased LINE-1 expression compared to control was observed at 6 h by 2.0 µg/mL BNT162b2, while lower BNT162b2 concentrations decreased LINE-1 expression at all time points (Figure 3).

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Figure 3.LINE-1 mRNA levels in Huh7 cells treated with BNT162b2. Huh7 cells were treated without (Ctrl) or with 0.5 (V1), 1 (V2), and 2 µg/mL (V3) of BNT162b2 for 6 (green dots), 24 (red dots), and 48 h (blue dots). RNA was purified and qPCR was performed using primers targeting LINE-1. RNA levels of LINE-1 are presented as 2−ΔΔCT values relative to house-keeping genes GAPDH and ACTB. Results are from five independent experiments (n = 5). Differences between respective groups were analyzed using two-tailed Student’s t-test. Data are expressed as the mean ± SEM. (* p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; *** p < 0.001 vs. respective control at each time point, or as indicated; † p < 0.05 vs. 6 h-Ctrl).Next, we studied the effect of BNT162b2 on LINE-1 protein level. The full-length LINE-1 consists of a 5′ untranslated region (UTR), two open reading frames (ORFs), ORF1 and ORF2, and a 3′UTR, of which ORF1 is an RNA binding protein with chaperone activity. The retrotransposition activity of LINE-1 has been demonstrated to involve ORF1 translocation to the nucleus [35]. Huh7 cells treated with or without BNT162b2 (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 µg/mL) for 6 h were fixed and stained with antibodies binding to LINE-1 ORF1p, and DNA-specific probe Hoechst for visualization of cell nucleus (Figure 4a). Quantification of immunofluorescence staining intensity showed that BNT162b2 increased LINE-1 ORF1p protein levels in both the whole cell area and nucleus at all concentrations tested (Figure 4b–d).

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Figure 4. Immunohistochemistry of Huh7 cells treated with BNT162b2 on LINE-1 protein distribution. Huh7 cells were treated without (Ctrl) or with 0.5, 1, and 2 µg/mL of BNT162b2 for 6 h. Cells were fixed and stained with antibodies binding to LINE-1 ORF1p (red) and DNA-specific probe Hoechst for visualization of cell nucleus (blue). (a) Representative images of LINE-1 expression in Huh7 cells treated with or without BNT162b2. (bd) Quantification of LINE-1 protein in whole cell area (b), cytosol (c), and nucleus (d). All data were analyzed using One-Way ANOVA, and graphs were created using GraphPad Prism V 9.2. All data is presented as mean ± SD (** p < 0.01; *** p < 0.001; **** p < 0.0001 as indicated).

3.3. Detection of Reverse Transcribed BNT162b2 DNA in Huh7 Cells

A previous study has shown that entry of LINE-1 protein into the nucleus is associated with retrotransposition [35]. In the immunofluorescence staining experiment described above, increased levels of LINE-1 in the nucleus were observed already at the lowest concentration of BNT162b2 (0.5 µg/mL). To examine if BNT162b2 is reversely transcribed into DNA when LINE-1 is elevated, we purified genomic DNA from Huh7 cells treated with 0.5 µg/mL of BNT162b2 for 6, 24, and 48 h. Purified DNA was treated with RNase to remove RNA and subjected to PCR using primers targeting BNT162b2, as illustrated in Figure 1. Amplified DNA fragments were then visualized by electrophoresis and gel-purified (Figure 5). BNT162b2 DNA amplicons were detected in all three time points (6, 24, and 48 h). Sanger sequencing confirmed that the DNA amplicons were identical to the BNT162b2 sequence flanked by the primers (Table 2). To ensure that the DNA amplicons were derived from DNA but not BNT162b2 RNA, we also performed PCR on RNA purified from Huh7 cells treated with 0.5 µg/mL BNT162b2 for 6 h, with or without RNase treatment (Ctrl 5 and 6 in Figure 5), and no amplicon was detected in the RNA samples subjected to PCR.

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Figure 5. Detection of DNA amplicons of BNT162b2 in Huh7 cells treated with BNT162b2. Huh7 cells were treated without (Ctrl) or with 0.5 µg/mL of BNT162b2 for 6, 24, and 48 h. Genomic DNA was purified and digested with 100 µg/mL RNase. PCR was run on all samples with primers targeting BNT162b2, as shown in Figure 1 and Table 1. DNA amplicons (444 bps) were visualized on agarose gel. BNT: BNT162b2; L: DNA ladder; Ctrl1: cultured Huh7 cells; Ctrl2: Huh7 cells without BNT162b2 treatment collected at 6 h; Ctrl3: Huh7 cells without BNT162b2 treatment collected at 24 h; Ctrl4: Huh7 cells without BNT162b2 treatment collected at 48 h; Ctrl5: RNA from Huh7 cells treated with 0.5 µg/mL of BNT162b2 for 6 h; Ctrl6: RNA from Huh7 cells treated with 0.5 µg/mL of BNT162b2 for 6 h, digested with RNase.Table 2. Sanger sequencing result of the BNT162b2 amplicon.

Table

4. Discussion

In this study we present evidence that COVID-19 mRNA vaccine BNT162b2 is able to enter the human liver cell line Huh7 in vitro. BNT162b2 mRNA is reverse transcribed intracellularly into DNA as fast as 6 h after BNT162b2 exposure. A possible mechanism for reverse transcription is through endogenous reverse transcriptase LINE-1, and the nucleus protein distribution of LINE-1 is elevated by BNT162b2.Intracellular accumulation of LNP in hepatocytes has been demonstrated in vivo [36]. A preclinical study on BNT162b2 showed that BNT162b2 enters the human cell line HEK293T cells and leads to robust expression of BNT162b2 antigen [37]. Therefore, in this study, we first investigated the entry of BNT162b2 in the human liver cell line Huh7 cells. The choice of BNT162b2 concentrations used in this study warrants explanation. BNT162b2 is administered as a series of two doses three weeks apart, and each dose contains 30 µg of BNT162b2 in a volume of 0.3 mL, which makes the local concentration at the injection site at the highest 100 µg/mL [31]. A previous study on mRNA vaccines against H10N8 and H7N9 influenza viruses using a similar LNP delivery system showed that the mRNA vaccine can distribute rather nonspecifically to several organs such as liver, spleen, heart, kidney, lung, and brain, and the concentration in the liver is roughly 100 times lower than that of the intra-muscular injection site [38]. In the assessment report on BNT162b2 provided to EMA by Pfizer, the pharmacokinetic distribution studies in rats demonstrated that a relatively large proportion (up to 18%) of the total dose distributes to the liver [26]. We therefore chose to use 0.5, 1, and 2 μg/mL of vaccine in our experiments on the liver cells. However, the effect of a broader range of lower and higher concentrations of BNT162b2 should also be verified in future studies.In the current study, we employed a human liver cell line for in vitro investigation. It is worth investigating if the liver cells also present the vaccine-derived SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, which could potentially make the liver cells targets for previously primed spike protein reactive cytotoxic T cells. There has been case reports on individuals who developed autoimmune hepatitis [39] after BNT162b2 vaccination. To obtain better understanding of the potential effects of BNT162b2 on liver function, in vivo models are desired for future studies.In the BNT162b2 toxicity report, no genotoxicity nor carcinogenicity studies have been provided [26]. Our study shows that BNT162b2 can be reverse transcribed to DNA in liver cell line Huh7, and this may give rise to the concern if BNT162b2-derived DNA may be integrated into the host genome and affect the integrity of genomic DNA, which may potentially mediate genotoxic side effects. At this stage, we do not know if DNA reverse transcribed from BNT162b2 is integrated into the cell genome. Further studies are needed to demonstrate the effect of BNT162b2 on genomic integrity, including whole genome sequencing of cells exposed to BNT162b2, as well as tissues from human subjects who received BNT162b2 vaccination.Human autonomous retrotransposon LINE-1 is a cellular endogenous reverse transcriptase and the only remaining active transposon in humans, able to retrotranspose itself and other nonautonomous elements [40,41], and ~17% of the human genome are comprised of LINE-1 sequences [42]. The nonautonomous Alu elements, short, interspersed nucleotide elements (SINEs), variable-number-of-tandem-repeats (VNTR), as well as cellular mRNA-processed pseudogenes, are retrotransposed by the LINE-1 retrotransposition proteins working in trans [43,44]. A recent study showed that endogenous LINE-1 mediates reverse transcription and integration of SARS-CoV-2 sequences in the genomes of infected human cells [25]. Furthermore, expression of endogenous LINE-1 is often increased upon viral infection, including SARS-CoV-2 infection [45,46,47]. Previous studies showed that LINE-1 retrotransposition activity is regulated by RNA metabolism [48,49], DNA damage response [50], and autophagy [51]. Efficient retrotransposition of LINE-1 is often associated with cell cycle and nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis [52,53], as well as exogenous retroviruses [54,55], which promotes entrance of LINE-1 into the nucleus. In our study, we observed increased LINE-1 ORF1p distribution as determined by immunohistochemistry in the nucleus by BNT162b2 at all concentrations tested (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/mL), while elevated LINE-1 gene expression was detected at the highest BNT162b2 concentration (2 μg/mL). It is worth noting that gene transcription is regulated by chromatin modifications, transcription factor regulation, and the rate of RNA degradation, while translational regulation of protein involves ribosome recruitment on the initiation codon, modulation of peptide elongation, termination of protein synthesis, or ribosome biogenesis. These two processes are controlled by different mechanisms, and therefore they may not always show the same change patterns in response to external challenges. The exact regulation of LINE-1 activity in response to BNT162b2 merits further study.The cell model that we used in this study is a carcinoma cell line, with active DNA replication which differs from non-dividing somatic cells. It has also been shown that Huh7 cells display significant different gene and protein expression including upregulated proteins involved in RNA metabolism [56]. However, cell proliferation is also active in several human tissues such as the bone marrow or basal layers of epithelia as well as during embryogenesis, and it is therefore necessary to examine the effect of BNT162b2 on genomic integrity under such conditions. Furthermore, effective retrotransposition of LINE-1 has also been reported in non-dividing and terminally differentiated cells, such as human neurons [57,58].The Pfizer EMA assessment report also showed that BNT162b2 distributes in the spleen (<1.1%), adrenal glands (<0.1%), as well as low and measurable radioactivity in the ovaries and testes (<0.1%) [26]. Furthermore, no data on placental transfer of BNT162b2 is available from Pfizer EMA assessment report. Our results showed that BNT162b2 mRNA readily enters Huh7 cells at a concentration (0.5 µg/mL) corresponding to 0.5% of the local injection site concentration, induce changes in LINE-1 gene and protein expression, and within 6 h, reverse transcription of BNT162b2 can be detected. It is therefore important to investigate further the effect of BNT162b2 on other cell types and tissues both in vitro and in vivo.

5. Conclusions

Our study is the first in vitro study on the effect of COVID-19 mRNA vaccine BNT162b2 on human liver cell line. We present evidence on fast entry of BNT162b2 into the cells and subsequent intracellular reverse transcription of BNT162b2 mRNA into DNA.

Supplementary Materials

The following supporting information can be downloaded at: https://www.mdpi.com/article/10.3390/cimb44030073/s1.

Author Contributions

M.A., F.O.F., D.Y., M.B. and C.L. performed in vitro experiments. M.A. and F.O.F. performed data analysis. M.R. and Y.D.M. contributed to the implementation of the research, designed, and supervised the study. Y.D.M. wrote the paper with input from all authors. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.

Funding

This study was supported by the Swedish Research Council, Strategic Research Area Exodiab, Dnr 2009-1039, the Swedish Government Fund for Clinical Research (ALF) and the foundation of Skåne University Hospital.

Institutional Review Board Statement

Not applicable.

Informed Consent Statement

Not applicable.

Data Availability Statement

All data supporting the findings of this study are available within the article and supporting information.

Acknowledgments

The authors thank Sven Haidl, Maria Josephson, Enming Zhang, Jia-Yi Li, Caroline Haikal, and Pradeep Bompada for their support to this study.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Pfizer BioNTech Covid Vaccine and Ovarian cysts – a phase IV clinical study of CDC and FDA data

Summary:

Ovarian cysts is found among people who get Pfizer BioNTech Covid Vaccine, especially for people who are 30-39 old, and after 30 days of getting the vaccine.

The phase IV clinical study analyzes which people get Pfizer BioNTech Covid Vaccine and have Ovarian cysts. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 286,220 people who have side effects when getting Pfizer BioNTech Covid Vaccine from the CDC and the FDA, and is updated regularly. You can use the study as a second opinion to make health care decisions.

With medical big data and AI algorithms, eHealthMe enables everyone to run phase IV clinical trial to detect adverse drug outcomes and monitor effectiveness. Our original studies have been referenced on 600+ peer-reviewed medical publications including The LancetMayo Clinic Proceedings, and Nature. Most recently, phase IV clinial trails for COVID 19 vaccines have been added, check here.


On Jan, 22, 2022

286,220 people reported to have side effects after getting Pfizer BioNTech Covid Vaccine.
Among them, 60 people (0.02%) have Ovarian cysts.


What is Ovarian cysts?

Ovarian cysts (fluid filled sacs of the ovary) is found to be associated with 1,592 drugs and 947 conditions by eHealthMe.

Number of reports submitted per year:

Pfizer biontech covid vaccine and Ovarian cysts?

Time to have Ovarian cysts from when people get Pfizer BioNTech Covid Vaccine *:

  • on the same day: 19.64 %
  • in the first week: 26.79 %
  • in the first 30 days: 23.21 %
  • after 30 days: 30.36 %

Age of people *:

  • 0-1: 0.0 %
  • 2-9: 0.0 %
  • 10-19: 8.33 %
  • 20-29: 12.5 %
  • 30-39: 43.75 %
  • 40-49: 20.83 %
  • 50-59: 4.17 %
  • 60+: 10.42 %

Did people recover *:

  • yes: 25.49 %
  • no: 74.51 %

Death as an outcome *:

  • yes: 0.0 %
  • no: 100 %

# of vaccine dose *:

  • 1: 40.35 %
  • 2: 59.65 %
  • 3+: 0.0 %

Common side effects people have besides Ovarian cysts *:

  1. Pain: 11 people, 18.33%
  2. Abdominal Pain: 9 people, 15.00%
  3. Menstruation Irregular: 9 people, 15.00%
  4. Abdominal Pain Lower: 7 people, 11.67%
  5. Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit): 7 people, 11.67%
  6. Ultrasound Abdomen Abnormal: 7 people, 11.67%
  7. Headache (pain in head): 7 people, 11.67%
  8. Fatigue (feeling of tiredness): 6 people, 10.00%
  9. Muscle Aches (muscle pain): 5 people, 8.33%
  10. Joint Pain: 5 people, 8.33%

* Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information.


Related studies

Other COVID vaccine studies:

Vaccine side effects by duration, gender, age and dose:

Common Pfizer biontech covid vaccine side effects:

Browse all side effects of Pfizer BioNTech Covid Vaccine:

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How the study uses the data?

The study is based on data from the CDC and the FDA.

Who is eHealthMe?

With medical big data and proven AI algorithms, eHealthMe provides a platform for everyone to run phase IV clinical trials. We study millions of patients and 5,000 more each day. Results of our real-world drug study have been referenced on 600+ peer-reviewed medical publications, including The LancetMayo Clinic Proceedings, and Nature. Our analysis results are available to researchers, health care professionals, patients (testimonials), and software developers (open API).

WARNING, DISCLAIMER, USE FOR PUBLICATION

WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health.

DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only. Our phase IV clinical studies alone cannot establish cause-effect relationship. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk.

If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date.

https://www.ehealthme.com/vs/pfizer-biontech-covid-vaccine/ovarian-cysts/

‘We Made a Big Mistake’ — COVID Vaccine Spike Protein Travels From Injection Site, Can Cause Organ Damage

Authors:  Children’s Health Defense

COVID vaccine researchers had previously assumed mRNA COVID vaccines would behave like traditional vaccines. The vaccine’s spike protein — responsible for infection and its most severe symptoms — would remain mostly in the injection site at the shoulder muscle or local lymph nodes.

But new research obtained by a group of scientists contradicts that theory, a Canadian cancer vaccine researcher said last week.

“We made a big mistake. We didn’t realize it until now,” said Byram Bridle, a viral immunologist and associate professor at University of Guelph, Ontario. “We thought the spike protein was a great target antigen, we never knew the spike protein itself was a toxin and was a pathogenic protein. So by vaccinating people we are inadvertently inoculating them with a toxin.”

Bridle, who was awarded a $230,000 grant by the Canadian government last year for research on COVID vaccine development, said he and a group of international scientists filed a request for information from the Japanese regulatory agency to get access to Pfizer’s “biodistribution study.”

Biodistribution studies are used to determine where an injected compound travels in the body, and which tissues or organs it accumulates in.

“It’s the first time ever scientists have been privy to seeing where these messenger RNA [mRNA] vaccines go after vaccination,” Bridle said in an interview with Alex Pierson where he first disclosed the data. “Is it a safe assumption that it stays in the shoulder muscle? The short answer is: absolutely not. It’s very disconcerting.”

The Sars-CoV-2 has a spike protein on its surface. That spike protein is what allows it to infect our bodies, Bridle explained. “That is why we have been using the spike protein in our vaccines,” Bridle said. “The vaccines we’re using get the cells in our bodies to manufacture that protein. If we can mount an immune response against that protein, in theory we could prevent this virus from infecting the body. That is the theory behind the vaccine.”

“However, when studying the severe COVID-19, […] heart problems, lots of problems with the cardiovascular system, bleeding and clotting, are all associated with COVID-19,”  he added. “In doing that research, what has been discovered by the scientific community, the spike protein on its own is almost entirely responsible for the damage to the cardiovascular system, if it gets into circulation.”

When the purified spike protein is injected into the blood of research animals, they experience damage to the cardiovascular system and the protein can cross the blood-brain barrier and cause damage to the brain, Bridle explained.

The biodistribution study obtained by Bridle shows the COVID spike protein gets into the blood where it circulates for several days post-vaccination and then accumulates in organs and tissues including the spleen, bone marrow, the liver, adrenal glands and in “quite high concentrations” in the ovaries.

“We have known for a long time that the spike protein is a pathogenic protein, Bridle said. “It is a toxin. It can cause damage in our body if it gets into circulation.”

A large number of studies have shown the most severe effects of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID, such as blood clotting and bleeding, are due to the effects of the spike protein of the virus itself.

A recent study in Clinical and Infectious Diseases led by researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Harvard Medical School measured longitudinal plasma samples collected from 13 recipients of the Moderna vaccine 1 and 29 days after the first dose and 1-28 days after the second dose.

Out of these individuals, 11 had detectable levels of SARS-CoV-2 protein in blood plasma as early as one day after the first vaccine dose, including three who had detectable levels of spike protein. A “subunit” protein called S1, part of the spike protein, was also detected.

Spike protein was detected an average of 15 days after the first injection, and one patient had spike protein detectable on day 29 –– one day after a second vaccine dose –– which disappeared two days later.

The results showed S1 antigen production after the initial vaccination can be detected by day one and is present beyond the injection site and the associated regional lymph nodes.

Assuming an average adult blood volume of approximately 5 liters, this corresponds to peak levels of approximately 0.3 micrograms of circulating free antigen for a vaccine designed only to express membrane-anchored antigen.

In a study published in Nature Neuroscience, lab animals injected with purified spike protein into their bloodstream developed cardiovascular problems. The spike protein also crossed the blood-brain barrier and caused damage to the brain.

It was a grave mistake to believe the spike protein would not escape into the blood circulation, according to Bridle. “Now, we have clear-cut evidence that the vaccines that make the cells in our deltoid muscles manufacture this protein — that the vaccine itself, plus the protein — gets into blood circulation,” he said.

Bridle said the scientific community has discovered the spike protein, on its own, is almost entirely responsible for the damage to the cardiovascular system, if it gets into circulation.

Once in circulation, the spike protein can attach to specific ACE2 receptors that are on blood platelets and the cells that line blood vessels, Bridle said. “When that happens it can do one of two things. It can either cause platelets to clump, and that can lead to clotting — that’s exactly why we’ve been seeing clotting disorders associated with these vaccines. It can also lead to bleeding,” he added.

Both clotting and bleeding are associated with vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT). Bridle also said the spike protein in circulation would explain recently reported heart problems in vaccinated teens.

Stephanie Seneff, senior research scientists at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said it is now clear vaccine content is being delivered to the spleen and the glands, including the ovaries and the adrenal glands, and is being shed into the medium and then eventually reaches the bloodstream causing systemic damage.

“ACE2 receptors are common in the heart and brain,” she added. “And this is how the spike protein causes cardiovascular and cognitive problems.”

Dr. J. Patrick Whelan, a pediatric rheumatologist, warned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in December mRNA vaccines could cause microvascular injury to the brain, heart, liver and kidneys in ways not assessed in safety trials.

In a public submission, Whelan sought to alert the FDA to the potential for vaccines designed to create immunity to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein to instead cause injuries.

Whelan was concerned the mRNA vaccine technology utilized by Pfizer and Moderna had “the potential to cause microvascular injury (inflammation and small blood clots called microthrombi) to the brain, heart, liver and kidneys in ways that were not assessed in the safety trials.”

Pathophysiology of COVID-19:

Mechanisms Underlying Disease Severity and Progression

Authors: Mary Kathryn Bohn,1,2, Alexandra Hall,1 Lusia Sepiashvili,1,2, Benjamin Jung,1,2 Shannon, Steele,1 and Khosrow Adeli1,2,3

The global epidemiology of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) suggests a wide spectrum of clinical severity, ranging from asymptomatic to fatal. Although the clinical and laboratory characteristics of COVID-19 patients have been well characterized, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying disease severity and progression remain unclear. This review highlights key mechanisms that have been proposed to contribute to COVID-19 progression from viral entry to multisystem organ failure, as well as the central role of the immune response in successful viral clearance or progression to death.

Introduction

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by a novel beta-coronavirus known as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). As of June 15, 2020, the number of global confirmed cases has surpassed 8 million, with over 400,000 reported mortalities. The unparalleled pathogenicity and global impact of this pandemic has rapidly engaged the scientific community in urgently needed research. Preliminary reports from the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention have estimated that the large majority of confirmed SARS-CoV-2 cases are mild (81%), with ~14% progressing to severe pneumonia and 5% developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), sepsis, and/or multisystem organ failure (MOF) (144). Although more data is urgently needed to elucidate the global epidemiology of COVID-19 (80), a wide spectrum of clinical severity is evident, with most patients able to mount a sufficient and appropriate immune response, ultimately leading to viral clearance and case resolution. However, a significant subset of patients present with severe clinical manifestations, requiring life-supporting treatment (51). The pathophysiological mechanisms behind key events in the progression from mild to severe disease remain unclear, warranting further investigation to inform therapeutic decisions. Here, we review the current literature and summarize key proposed mechanisms of COVID-19 pathophysiological progression (FIGURE 1). Key Pathophysiological Mechanisms: Our Current Understanding Viral Invasion The first step in COVID-19 pathogenesis is viral invasion via its target host cell receptors. SARSCoV-2 viral entry has been described in detail elsewhere (138). In brief, SARS-CoV-2 consists of four main structural glycoproteins: spike (S), membrane (M), envelope (E), and nucleocapsid (N). The M, E, and N proteins are critical for viral particle assembly and release, whereas the S protein is responsible for viral binding and entry into host cells (33, 76, 89, 143, 148). Similar to SARS-CoV, several researchers have identified human angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as an entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2 (75, 99, 148, 156). SARSCoV-2 is mostly transmissible through large respiratory droplets, directly infecting cells of the upper and lower respiratory tract, especially nasal ciliated and alveolar epithelial cells (161). In addition to the lungs, ACE2 is also expressed in various other human tissues, such as the small intestine, kidneys, heart, thyroid, testis, and adipose tissue, indicating the virus may directly infect cells of other organ systems when viremia is present (77). Interestingly, although the S proteins of SARS-CoV-2 and SARSCoV share 72% homology in amino acid sequences, SARS-CoV-2 has been reported to have a higher affinity for the ACE2 receptor (18, 21, 143). Following host cell binding, viral and cell membranes fuse, enabling the virus to enter into the cell (89). For many coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV, host cell binding alone is insufficient to facilitate membrane fusion, requiring S-protein priming or cleavage by host cell proteases or transmembrane serine proteases (9, 10, 90, 94, 108). Indeed, Hoffman and colleagues demonstrated that S-protein priming by transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2), which may be substituted by cathepsin B/L, is required to facilitate SARS-CoV-2 entry into host cells (58). In addition, unlike other coronaviruses, SARS-CoV-2 has been reported to possess a furin-like cleavage site in the S-protein domain, located between the S1 and S2 subunits (31, 138). Furin-like proteases are ubiquitously expressed, albeit at low levels, indicating that S-protein priming at this cleavage site may contribute to the widened cell tropism and enhanced transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 (123). However, whether furin-like protease-mediated cleavage is required for SARS-CoV-2 host entry has yet to be determined. Blocking or inhibiting these processing enzymes may serve as a potential antiviral target (130). Interestingly, SARS-CoV-2 has developed a unique S1/S2 cleavage site in its S protein, characterized by a four-amino acid insertion, which seems to be absent in all other coronaviruses (4). This molecular mimicry has been identified as an efficient evolutionary adaptation that some viruses have acquired for exploiting the host cellular machinery. Once the nucleocapsid is deposited into the cytoplasm of the host cell, the RNA genome is replicated and translated into structural and accessory proteins. Vesicles containing the newly formed viral particles are then transported to and fuse with the plasma membrane, releasing them to infect other host cells in the same fashion (33, 89, 105). Although much progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying SARS-CoV-2 invasion, additional research is needed to delineate exactly how cleavage of the S proteins by TMPRSS2 confers viral particle entry as well as how S-protein cleavage by membrane proteases contributes to viral penetration.

For More Information: https://journals.physiology.org/doi/pdf/10.1152/physiol.00019.2020