Studies: COVID tied to persistent cognitive deficits in seniors

Authors: Mary Van Beusekom | News Writer | CIDRAP News  | Jul 30, 2021

New studies show an association between COVID-19 and cognitive impairment in older patients, with one reporting memory problems and worse physical health 8 months after diagnosis and others finding cognitive decline and accelerated Alzheimer’s disease symptoms as long as 6 months after infection.

Memory problems, worse physical health

University of Oslo researchers led the first study, published yesterday in JAMA Network Open. It involved 9,705 nonhospitalized adults in Norway who had been either tested for SARS-CoV-2 at four large labs from Feb 1 to Apr 15, 2020, or randomly selected (untested). At that time, nearly all COVID-19 testing in Norway was in symptomatic patients. Participants, who completed the RAND 36-Item Health Survey, were, on average, 47 years old, and 66% were women.

After an average follow-up of 257 days after a baseline survey, 72 of the 651 COVID-19–positive respondents (11%) said they had memory problems, compared with only 254 of 5,712 (4%) of those who tested negative for infection and 80 of 3,342 untested participants (2%).

A multiple logistic regression model showed that SARS-CoV-2 positivity at baseline was strongly linked to memory deficits at 8 months follow-up, compared with the untested group (odds ratio, 4.66).

At the same time, 267 of 649 participants (41%) in the COVID-19–positive group reported that their health had substantially deteriorated over the previous year, and 59 of the 267 (82%) who reported memory impairment also said their health had worsened. Eighty-one of 651 positive respondents (12%) said they had difficulty concentrating. Similar numbers of patients in the three different groups reported depression, lack of energy, and pain.

For More Information: https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2021/07/studies-covid-tied-persistent-cognitive-deficits-seniors

COVID and the brain: researchers zero in on how damage occurs

Authors: Michael Marshall

Growing evidence suggests that the coronavirus causes ‘brain fog’ and other neurological symptoms through multiple mechanisms.

How COVID-19 damages the brain is becoming clearer. New evidence suggests that the coronavirus’s assault on the brain could be multipronged: it might attack certain brain cells directly, reduce blood flow to brain tissue or trigger production of immune molecules that can harm brain cells.

Infection with the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 can cause memory loss, strokes and other effects on the brain. The question, says Serena Spudich, a neurologist at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, is: “Can we intervene early to address these abnormalities so that people don’t have long-term problems?”

With so many people affected — neurological symptoms appeared in 80% of the people hospitalized with COVID-19 who were surveyed in one study1 — researchers hope that the growing evidence base will point the way to better treatments.

For More Information: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01693-6

Recovered COVID Patients Suffering ‘Significant Cognitive Deficits’ According To Large-Scale UK Study

Over 190 million people have officially contracted SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes Covid-19. Of that, the vast majority have recovered – while up to one-third reportedly suffer from lingering symptoms of varying severity, known as ‘long covid.’

Common complaints include a lack of smell and taste, as well as “brain fog” – in which sufferers often complain of ongoing confusion, lack of focus, and migraines – well after they’ve ‘recovered’ from the disease.

Last week, The Independent reported that Covid-19 may accelerate the onset of Alzheimer’s disease in patients suffering from neurological symptoms, while another study noted in the report found that coronavirus patients “are more susceptible to long-term memory and thinking problems.”

Last September, a study offered the first clear evidence that Covid-19 ‘hijacks’ brain cells to make copies of itself – starving nearby cells of oxygen. The same researchers found last July that some Covid-19 patients have developed serious neurological complications, including nerve damage.

For More Information: http://wp.cov19longhaulfoundation.org/wp-admin/post.php?post=1508&action=edit

Researcher: ‘We Made a Big Mistake’ on COVID-19 Vaccine

Authors: Dr. Joseph Mercola

  • Canadian immunologist and vaccine researcher Byram Bridle, Ph.D., has gained access to Pfizer’s biodistribution study from the Japanese regulatory agency. The research, previously unseen, demonstrates a huge problem with all COVID-19 vaccines
  • The assumption that vaccine developers have been working with is that the mRNA in the vaccines would primarily remain in and around the vaccination site. Pfizer’s data, however, show the mRNA and subsequent spike protein are widely distributed in the body within hours
  • This is a serious problem, as the spike protein is a toxin shown to cause cardiovascular and neurological damage. It also has reproductive toxicity, and Pfizer’s biodistribution data show it accumulates in women’s ovaries
  • Once in your blood circulation, the spike protein binds to platelet receptors and the cells that line your blood vessels. When that happens, it can cause platelets to clump together, resulting in blood clots, and/or cause abnormal bleeding
  • Pfizer documents submitted to the European Medicines Agency also show the company failed to follow industry-standard quality management practices during preclinical toxicology studies and that key studies did not meet good laboratory practice standards

The more we learn about the COVID-19 vaccines, the worse they look. In a recent interview with Alex Pierson (above), Canadian immunologist and vaccine researcher Byram Bridle, Ph.D., dropped a shocking truth bomb that immediately went viral, despite being censored by Google.

For More Information: https://rightsfreedoms.wordpress.com/2021/06/16/researcher-we-made-a-big-mistake-on-covid-19-vaccine/

COVID-19 ‘brain fog’ inspires search for causes and treatments

Authors: Kelly Servick

The true prevalence of cognitive problems in COVID-19 survivors is elusive, and the underlying causes of lingering symptoms are the subject of ongoing studies. But it’s now clear that trouble thinking, concentrating, and remembering can be among the most debilitating “long-haul” symptoms and can persist for months. As more and more people seek help to overcome their brain fog at clinics set up for post–COVID-19 care, researchers and physicians are turning to treatments developed for stroke and traumatic brain injuries. And a few are setting out to test cognitive training video games they hope will expand the reach of therapy.

“Even if it’s a fairly small percentage [of survivors] who report cognitive problems, the number of overall people in that category … represents a tremendous problem,” says James Jackson, a clinical psychologist at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine’s ICU Recovery Center, where Furr will participate in a support group for COVID-19 long haulers.

For More Information: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021/04/covid-19-brain-fog-inspires-search-causes-and-treatments

COVID and the brain: researchers zero in on how damage occurs

Authors: Michael Marshall

How COVID-19 damages the brain is becoming clearer. New evidence suggests that the coronavirus’s assault on the brain could be multipronged: it might attack certain brain cells directly, reduce blood flow to brain tissue or trigger production of immune molecules that can harm brain cells.

Infection with the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 can cause memory loss, strokes and other effects on the brain. The question, says Serena Spudich, a neurologist at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, is: “Can we intervene early to address these abnormalities so that people don’t have long-term problems?”

With so many people affected — neurological symptoms appeared in 80% of the people hospitalized with COVID-19 who were surveyed in one study1 — researchers hope that the growing evidence base will point the way to better treatments.

Breaking into the brain

SARS-CoV-2 can have severe effects: a preprint posted last month2 compared images of people’s brains from before and after they had COVID-19, and found loss of grey matter in several areas of the cerebral cortex. (Preprints are published without peer review.)

Early in the pandemic, researchers speculated that the virus might cause damage by somehow entering the brain and infecting neurons, the cells responsible for transmitting and processing information. But studies have since indicated3 that the virus has difficulty getting past the brain’s defence system — the blood–brain barrier — and that it doesn’t necessarily attack neurons in any significant way.

For More Information: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01693-6?WT.ec_id=NATURE-20210722&sap-outbound-id=90D704D0EFF250722F74CEC6E887640B2E9C09C8