COVID-19 live updates: Vaccine protection against hospitalization is dropping slightly, CDC says

The CDC initially said 97% of people hospitalized with COVID-19 are unvaccinated

Authors: By Julia Jacobo and Ivan Pereira Last Updated: August 30, 2021, 5:18 PM ET

The COVID-19 vaccines’ ability to keep people out of the hospital appears to be dropping slightly, particularly for those 75 and older, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Monday during an advisory panel.

The CDC has previously estimated that 97% of people in the hospital being treated for COVID-19 are unvaccinated, but that data was collected before the spread of delta, a hyper-transmissible variant that many doctors have warned appears to be making people sicker.

The latest CDC analysis estimates that the ability of the COVID vaccines to keep a person out of the hospital is now between 75% to 95%.

For people older than 75 in particular, vaccine effectiveness against hospitalization experienced the steepest decline, from more than 90% to 80% between June and July.

Health experts are also concerned that a person’s immunity could be waning over time, particularly among older people whose bodies are less likely than younger people to develop a strong immune response to the vaccines.

However, the vaccine still remain highly effective at preventing serious illness, according to the briefing.

CDC Reports Show Unvaccinated Way More Likely To Be Hospitalized For COVID-19 Despite Drop In Vaccine Effectiveness

Authors: SEBASTIAN HUGHES CONTRIBUTOR August 24, 20216:52 PM ET

A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report released Tuesday showed vaccinated individuals are far less likely to be hospitalized from COVID-19, even though immunity appears to decrease over time.

Approximately 3% of vaccinated people who caught COVID-19 between May 1 and July 25 in Los Angeles County had to be hospitalized, compared to 8% of the unvaccinated, according to the CDC report. Only 0.5% of those who were vaccinated had to be placed in the ICU, as opposed to 1.5% of the unvaccinated.

The vaccinated were five times less likely to test positive and 29 times less likely to be hospitalized than the unvaccinated in the county, the report stated. A report released earlier in August by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health estimated vaccinated hospitalizations to be four and 14 times less likely, respectively.

Out of 43,127 COVID infections, 25% were among the vaccinated, 3% were among the partially vaccinated and 71% were among the unvaccinated, which indicates the effectiveness of the vaccines has moderately waned over time, according to the CDC.

A separate report released Tuesday showed the effectiveness of the vaccine in frontline healthcare workers had decreased to 66%, but didn’t specify how quickly effectiveness decreases. Another report released Aug. 18 showed vaccine effectiveness had decreased in New York from 92% in early May to 80% by late July.

Cases and deaths in the U.S. have surged because of the delta variant. About 93% of cases in the country can be attributed to it, the CDC has estimated. (RELATED: What Will It Take To Get Back To Normal? Here’s What The Experts Say)

The CDC recommended vaccinated individuals wear masks in areas of substantial or high transmission in July and announced on Wednesday that booster shots would become available to most people.

Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Dr. Anthony Fauci told CNN’s “Anderson Cooper 360” on Monday that the virus could be under control by spring 2022 if most people get vaccinated.

“You have either the overwhelming majority of the population vaccinated, those who have been infected and have cleared the virus will have a degree of protection, and we’re recommending that those people also get vaccinated because the degree of protection that you could induce in someone who has been infected, who has then recovered and then vaccinated, is an enormous increase in the degree of protection,” Fauci told CNN.

Associations between body-mass index and COVID-19 severity in 6·9 million people in England: a prospective, community-based, cohort study

  1. Authors: Min Gao, MSc *, Carmen Piernas, PhD  , Nerys M Astbury, PhD, Prof Julia Hippisley-Cox, FRCPProf Stephen O’Rahilly, FRS, Prof Paul Aveyard, FRCGP 

Summary

Background

Obesity is a major risk factor for adverse outcomes after infection with SARS-CoV-2. We aimed to examine this association, including interactions with demographic and behavioural characteristics, type 2 diabetes, and other health conditions.

Methods

In this prospective, community-based, cohort study, we used de-identified patient-level data from the QResearch database of general practices in England, UK. We extracted data for patients aged 20 years and older who were registered at a practice eligible for inclusion in the QResearch database between Jan 24, 2020 (date of the first recorded infection in the UK) and April 30, 2020, and with available data on BMI. Data extracted included demographic, clinical, clinical values linked with Public Health England’s database of positive SARS-CoV-2 test results, and death certificates from the Office of National Statistics. Outcomes, as a proxy measure of severe COVID-19, were admission to hospital, admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), and death due to COVID-19. We used Cox proportional hazard models to estimate the risk of severe COVID-19, sequentially adjusting for demographic characteristics, behavioral factors, and comorbidities.

Findings

Among 6 910 695 eligible individuals (mean BMI 26·78 kg/m2 [SD 5·59]), 13 503 (0·20%) were admitted to hospital, 1601 (0·02%) to an ICU, and 5479 (0·08%) died after a positive test for SARS-CoV-2. We found J-shaped associations between BMI and admission to hospital due to COVID-19 (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] per kg/m2 from the nadir at BMI of 23 kg/m2 of 1·05 [95% CI 1·05–1·05]) and death (1·04 [1·04–1·05]), and a linear association across the whole BMI range with ICU admission (1·10 [1·09–1·10]). We found a significant interaction between BMI and age and ethnicity, with higher HR per kg/m2 above BMI 23 kg/m2 for younger people (adjusted HR per kg/m2 above BMI 23 kg/m2 for hospital admission 1·09 [95% CI 1·08–1·10] in 20–39 years age group vs 80–100 years group 1·01 [1·00–1·02]) and Black people than White people (1·07 [1·06–1·08] vs 1·04 [1·04–1·05]). The risk of admission to hospital and ICU due to COVID-19 associated with unit increase in BMI was slightly lower in people with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease than in those without these morbidities.

For More Information: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/landia/article/PIIS2213-8587(21)00089-9/fulltext