Covid-19: UK studies find gastrointestinal symptoms are common in children

Authors: Susan Mayor BMJ 2020; 370 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m3484 (Published 07 September 2020)Cite this as: BMJ 2020;370:m3484

Gastrointestinal symptoms are common in children infected with SARS-CoV-2 and should trigger tests for the virus, researchers have said.

A prospective study of 992 healthy children (median age 10.1 years) of healthcare workers from across the UK found that 68 (6.9%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies.1 Half of the children testing positive reported no symptoms, but for those that did the commonest were fever (21 of 68, 31%); gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhoea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps (13 of 68, 19%); and headache (12 of 68, 18%).

Latest findings from the Covid-19 Symptom Study app,2 which was launched in late March to track people’s symptoms, also show that gastrointestinal symptoms occur frequently in children with positive swab tests.3

Tom Waterfield, lead author of the antibodies study, told The BMJ, “Based on our findings I think that gastrointestinal symptoms should be added to the current list—high temperature, cough, and loss or change in sense of smell or taste—that trigger testing for coronavirus.” He added, “Diarrhoea and vomiting in children should trigger a test.”

Modelling showed that gastrointestinal symptoms were significantly associated with the presence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, in addition to known household contact with confirmed SARS-CoV-2, fatigue, and changes in sense of smell or taste.

“Although diarrhoea and vomiting may not be on the official covid-19 testing strategy, we need to be cautious in children with these symptoms,” said Waterfield, senior lecturer at Queen’s University Belfast and paediatric emergency medicine physician at the Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children. “They need to have had 48 hours clear of gastrointestinal symptoms before they go back to school to help reduce the potential spread of the virus.”

Tim Spector, the study lead and professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London, said, “Looking at data from 250 000 children we found those with a positive swab test have a different range of symptoms to adults. Cough and shortness of breath are much less frequent and gastrointestinal problems, especially loss of appetite, more frequent. Fever is still a feature, as in adults.”

He said that the study confirmed the need to add a wider range of symptoms to those listed for covid-19. “Around 50% of children did not have the three core adult symptoms (high temperature, cough, and loss or change in sense of smell or taste) and may present with a wide range of non-specific symptoms, such as malaise and loss of appetite, although skin rash affected one in six,” he said. “The key is for parents to keep children at home with these non-specific signs until they feel better, until tests get more rapid and accessible.”

Spector is asking parents to start logging information for their children on the app, which invites users to report regularly on their health. He added that the team is adding school specific features to help provide data on infection rates related to schools.

References

  1. Waterfield T, Watson C, Moore R, et al. Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in children: a prospective multicentre cohort study. medRxiv 2020.08.31.20183095 [Preprint]. 2 September 2020. www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.08.31.20183095v1.
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    . Covid-19: Researchers launch app to track spread of symptoms in the UK. BMJ2020;368:m1263. doi:10.1136/bmj.m1263 pmid:32220898FREE Full Text

Link between fever, diarrhea, severe COVID-19, and persistent anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies

Authors: By Dr. Liji Thomas, MD Jan 7 2021

Ever since the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic began, there have been many attempts to understand the nature and duration of immunity against the causative agent, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).

A new preprint research paper appearing on the medRxiv* server describes a link between the persistence of neutralizing antibodies against the virus, disease severity, and specific COVID-19 symptoms.

Permanent immunity is essential if the pandemic is to end. In the earlier SARS epidemic, antibodies were found to last for three or more years after infection in most patients. With the current virus, it may last for six or more months at least, as appears from some reports. Other researchers have concluded that immunity wanes rapidly over the same period, with some patients who were tested positive for antibodies becoming seronegative later on. This discrepancy may be traceable to variation in testing methods, sample sizes and testing time points, as well as disease severity.

Study details

The current study looked at a population of over a hundred convalescent COVID-19 patients, testing most of them for antibodies at five weeks and three months from symptom resolution.

The researchers used a multiplex assay that measured the Immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels against four SARS-CoV-2 antigens, one from SARS-CoV, and four from circulating seasonal coronaviruses. In addition, they carried out an inhibition assay against SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor-binding domain (RBD)-angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) binding and a neutralization assay against the virus. The antibody titers were then plotted against various clinical features and demographic factors.

Antibody titers higher in COVID-19 convalescents

The researchers found that severe disease is correlated with advanced age and the male sex. Patients with underlying vascular disease were more likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19, but those with asthma were relatively spared.

Convalescent COVID-19 patients had higher IgG levels against all four SARS-CoV-2 antigens, relative to controls, and in 98% of cases, at least one of the tests was likely to show higher binding compared to controls. IgGs targeting the viral spike and RBD were likely to be much more discriminatory between SARS-CoV-2 patients and controls. Interestingly, anti-SARS-CoV IgG, as well as anti-seasonal betacoronavirus antibodies, were likely to be higher in these patients.

Anti-spike and anti-nucleocapsid IgG levels, as well as neutralizing antibody titers, were higher in convalescent hospitalized COVID-19 patients than in convalescent non-hospitalized patients, and the titers were positively associated with disease severity.Antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 persist three months after COVID-19 symptom resolution. Sera from COVID-19 convalescent subjects (n=79) collected 5 weeks (w) and 3 months (m) after symptom resolution were subjected to multiplex assay to detect IgG that binds to SARS-CoV-2 S, NTD, RBD and N antigens (A), to RBD-ACE2 binding inhibition assay (B), and to SARS-CoV-2 neutralization assay (C). Dots, lines, and asterisks in red represent non-hospitalized (n=67) and in blue represent hospitalized (n=12) subjects with lines connecting the two time points for individual subjects (*p<0.05 and **p<0.01 by paired t test).Antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 persist three months after COVID-19 symptom resolution. Sera from COVID-19 convalescent subjects (n=79) collected 5 weeks (w) and 3 months (m) after symptom resolution were subjected to multiplex assay to detect IgG that binds to SARS-CoV-2 S, NTD, RBD and N antigens (A), to RBD-ACE2 binding inhibition assay (B), and to SARS-CoV-2 neutralization assay (C). Dots, lines, and asterisks in red represent non-hospitalized (n=67) and in blue represent hospitalized (n=12) subjects with lines connecting the two time points for individual subjects (*p<0.05 and **p<0.01 by paired t test).

Clinical correlates of higher antibody titer

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When antibody titers in non-hospitalized subjects were compared with clinical and demographic variables, they found that older males with a higher body mass index (BMI) and a Charlson Comorbidity Index score >2 were likely to have higher antibody titers. COVID-19 symptoms that correlated with higher antibody levels in these patients comprise fever, diarrhea, abdominal pain and loss of appetite. Chest tightening, headache and sore throat were associated with less severe symptoms.

The link between the specific symptoms listed above with higher antibody titers could indicate that they mark a robust systemic inflammatory response, which in turn is necessary for a strong antibody response. Diarrhea may mark severe disease, but it is strange that in this case, it was not more frequent in the hospitalized cohort. Alternatively, diarrhea may have strengthened the immune antibody response via the exposure of the virus to more immune cells via the damaged enteric mucosa. More study is required to clarify this finding.

Potential substitute for neutralizing assay

The binding assay showed that the convalescent serum at five weeks inhibited RBD-ACE2 binding much more powerfully than control serum. Neutralizing activity was also higher in these sera, but in 15% of cases, convalescent patients showed comparable neutralizing antibody titers to those in control sera. On the whole, however, there was a positive association between neutralizing antibody titer, anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG titers, and inhibition of ACE2 binding.

Persistent immunity at three months

This study also shows that SARS-CoV-2 antibodies persist in these patients at even three months after symptoms subside, with persistent IgG titers against the SARS-CoV-2 spike, RBD, nucleocapsid and N-terminal domain antigens. Binding and neutralization assays remained highly inhibitory throughout this period. The same was true of antibodies against the other coronaviruses tested as well, an effect that has been seen with other viruses and could be the result of cross-reactive anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. Alternatively, it could be due to the activation of memory B cells formed in response to infection by the seasonal beta-coronaviruses.

Conclusion

IgG titers, particularly against S and RBD, and RBD-ACE2 binding inhibition better differentiate between COVID-19 convalescent and naive individuals than the neutralizing assay,” the researchers concluded.

These could be combined into a single diagnostic test, they suggest, with extreme sensitivity and specificity. The correlation with neutralizing antibody titers could indicate that the neutralizing assay, which is more expensive, sophisticated and expensive, as well as more dangerous for the investigators, could be replaced by the other antibody tests without loss of value.

In short, the study shows that specific antibodies persist for three months at least following recovery; antibody titers correlate with COVID-19-related fever, loss of appetite, abdominal pain and diarrhea; and are also higher in older males with more severe disease, a higher BMI and CCI above 2. Further research would help understand the lowest protective titer that prevents reinfection, and the duration of immunity.

*Important Notice

medRxiv publishes preliminary scientific reports that are not peer-reviewed and, therefore, should not be regarded as conclusive, guide clinical practice/health-related behavior, or treated as established information.Journal reference:

COVID-19-associated diarrhea

World J Gastroenterol. 2021 Jun 21; 27(23): 3208–3222.Published online 2021 Jun 21. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v27.i23.3208PMCID: PMC8218355PMID: 34163106

Authors: Klara MegyeriÁron DernovicsZaid I I Al-Luhaibi, and András Rosztóczy

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) recently emerged as a highly virulent respiratory pathogen that is known as the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Diarrhea is a common early symptom in a significant proportion of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. SARS-CoV-2 can infect and replicate in esophageal cells and enterocytes, leading to direct damage to the intestinal epithelium. The infection decreases the level of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptors, thereby altering the composition of the gut microbiota. SARS-CoV-2 elicits a cytokine storm, which contributes to gastrointestinal inflammation. The direct cytopathic effects of SARS-CoV-2, gut dysbiosis, and aberrant immune response result in increased intestinal permeability, which may exacerbate existing symptoms and worsen the prognosis. By exploring the elements of pathogenesis, several therapeutic options have emerged for the treatment of COVID-19 patients, such as biologics and biotherapeutic agents. However, the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in the feces may facilitate the spread of COVID-19 through fecal-oral transmission and contaminate the environment. Thus gastrointestinal SARS-CoV-2 infection has important epidemiological significance. The development of new therapeutic and preventive options is necessary to treat and restrict the spread of this severe and widespread infection more effectively. Therefore, we summarize the key elements involved in the pathogenesis and the epidemiology of COVID-19-associated diarrhea.

For More Information: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8218355/