Here’s what we know so far about the long-term symptoms ofCOVID-19

July 26, 2020 3.56pm EDT

We’re now all too familiar with the common symptoms of COVID-19: a fever, dry cough and fatigue. Some people also experience aches and pains, a sore throat, and loss of taste or smell.

Sufferers with mild illness might expect to get better after a few weeks. But there’s mounting evidence this isn’t the case, and COVID-19 may leave a long-lasting impression on its victims – not just the most severely affected or the elderly and frail.

It’s not just an infection of the lungs

On the surface, COVID-19 is a lung disease. The SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus infects cells of the respiratory tract and can cause life-threatening pneumonia.

However, the full range of symptoms affects multiple parts of the body. An app that records daily symptoms developed at King’s College London has tracked the progress of more than 4 million COVID-19 patients in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the United States.

Besides the well-described symptoms of fever, cough and loss of smell are other effects, including fatigue, rash, headache, abdominal pain and diarrhoea. People who develop more severe forms of the disease also report confusion, severe muscle pains, cough and shortness of breath.

About 20% of those infected with COVID-19 require hospitalisation to treat their pneumonia, and many need assistance with oxygen. In about 5% of cases the pneumonia becomes so severe patients are admitted to intensive care for breathing support.

It trips the immune system

People with severe COVID-19 seem to show an altered immune response even in the disease’s early stages. They have fewer circulating immune cells, which fail to efficiently control the virus, and instead suffer an exaggerated inflammatory response (the “cytokine storm”).

This is increasingly recognised as one of the main factors that makes the disease so serious in some patients. Suppressing this exaggerated response with the immunosuppressant dexamethasone remains the only treatment that reduces death rates in those who require oxygen support or intensive care.


Read more: Dexamethasone: the cheap, old and boring drug that’s a potential coronavirus treatment


Patients with severe COVID-19 describe a far more complex range of symptoms than would normally be seen with pneumonia alone. This can include brain inflammation (encephalitis), causing confusion and reduced consciousness. Up to 6% of severe sufferers may have a stroke.

Pathology studies and autopsies of patients who died from COVID-19 reveal the expected features of severe pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), with extensive inflammation and scarring. ARDS occurs when there’s sudden and widespread inflammation in the lungs, resulting in shortness of breath and blueish skin.

Uniquely, however, they also reveal the virus seems to directly cause inflammation of the small capillaries or blood vessels, not just in the lungs but in multiple organs, leading to blood clots and damage to the kidney and heart.

Persistent symptoms ‘deeply frustrating’

Anyone with a severe disease would be expected to suffer long-lasting consequences. But COVID-19 seems to have persistent symptoms even in those with milder forms of the illness.

Social media is replete with stories of survivors afflicted by ongoing symptoms. Support groups have emerged on Slack and Facebook hosting thousands of people, some still suffering more than 60 days after infection. They call themselves “long-termers” or “long-haulers”.

One of the most well-known sufferers is Paul Garner, an infectious disease specialist at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine in the UK. He was infected in late March and his symptoms continue. In a blog post published by the British Medical Journal he describes having a:

…muggy head, upset stomach, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), pins and needles, breathlessness, dizziness and arthritis in the hands.

These symptoms have waxed and waned but not yet resolved. He says this is:

…deeply frustrating. A lot of people start doubting themselves… Their partners wonder if there is something psychologically wrong with them.

So far, only one peer-reviewed study has reported results on the long-term symptoms of COVID-19 infection: a single group of 143 survivors from Rome. Most of them did not need hospitalization and all were assessed at least 60 days after infection. They reported a worsened quality of life in 44.1% of cases, including symptoms of persistent fatigue (53.1%), breathlessness (43.4%), joint pain (27.3%), and chest pain (21.7%).

Covid-19 Vaccine Analysis: The most common adverse events reported so far

Authors: DATED: AUGUST 6, 2021 BY SHARYL ATTKISSON 

As of July 19, 2021 there were 419,513 adverse event reports associated with Covid-19 vaccination in the U.S., with a total of 1,814,326 symptoms reported. That’s according to the federal Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) database.

Report an adverse event after vaccination online here.

Each symptom reported does not necessarily equal one patient. Adverse event reports often include multiple symptoms for a single patient.

Reporting of illnesses and symptoms that occur after Covid-19 vaccination does not necessarily mean they were caused by the vaccine. The system is designed to collect adverse events that occur after vaccination to uncover any patterns of illnesses that were not captured during vaccine studies.

Read CDC info on Covid-19 vaccine here.

Scientists have estimated that adverse events occur at a rate many fold higher than what is reported in VAERS, since it is assumed that most adverse events are not reported through the tracking system. Reports can be made by doctors, patients or family members and/or acquaintances, or vaccine industry representatives. 

Read: Exclusive summary: Covid-19 vaccine concerns.

Some observers claim Covid-19 vaccine adverse events are not as likely to be underreported as those associated with other medicine, due to close monitoring and widespread publicity surrounding Covid-19 vaccination.

Approximately 340 million doses of Covid-19 vaccine have been given in the U.S. Slightly less than half of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the benefits of Covid-19 vaccine outweigh the risks for all groups and age categories authorized to receive it.

Watch: CDC disinformation re: studies on Covid-19 vaccine effectiveness in people who have had Covid-19.

The following is a summary of some of the most frequent adverse events reported to VAERS after Covid-19 vaccination. (It is not the entire list.)

Most common Covid-19 vaccine adverse events reported as of July 19, 2021

Yellow highlighted adverse events are subjects of investigations, warnings or stated concerns by public health officials. For details, click here.

128,370 Muscle, bone, joint pain and swelling including:

  • 39,902 Pain in extremity
  • 37,819 Myalgia, muscle pain, weakness, fatigue, spasms, disorders, related
  • 30,138 Arthralgia, joint pain or arthritis, swelling, joint disease, bone pain, spinal osteoarthritis
  • 14,682 Back pain, neck pain
  • 5,829 Muscle and skeletal pain, stiffness, weakness

119,866 Injection site pain, bleeding, hardening, bruising, etc.

105,332 Skin reddening, at injection site or elsewhere, rash, hives

100,564 Fatigue, lethargy, malaise, asthenia, abnormal weakness, loss of energy

89,302 Headache, incl. migraine, sinus

68,252 Vomiting, nausea

68,064 Fever

63,133 Chills

60,913 Pain

49,574 Dizziness

34,076 Flushing, hot flush, feeling hot, abnormally warm skin

31,785 Lung pain or abnormalities, fluid in lung, respiratory tract or lung congestion or infection, wheezing, acute respiratory failure including:

  • 23,005 Dyspnoea, difficulty breathing
  • 1,398 Pneumonia
  • 1,128 Respiratory arrest, failure, stopped or inefficient breathing, abnormal breathing
  • 563 Covid-19 pneumonia
  • 265 Mechanical ventilation
  • 217 Bronchitis

30,909 Skin swelling, pain, tightness, face swelling, swelling under skin, hives, angioedema including:

  • 7,579 Skin pain, sensitivity, burning, discoloration, tenderness

25,319 Heart failure, heart rhythm and rate abnormalities, atrial fibrillation, palpitations, flutter, murmur, pacemaker added, fluid in heart, abnormal echocardiogram including:

  • 3,105 Heart attack or cardiac arrest, sudden loss of blood flow from failure to pump to heart effectively, cardiac failure, disorder

22,085 Itchiness

29,861 Sensory disturbance including:

  • 8,236 Tinnitus, hearing noise
  • 7,951 Abnormal vision, blindness
  • 6,349 Ageusia, loss of taste, altered taste, disorders
  • 2,249 Anosmia, loss of smell, parosmia (rotten smell)
  • 2,075 Hypersensitivity
  • 1,560 Sensitivity or reaction to light 
  • 890 Hearing loss, deafness