4,811 recovered Israeli COVID patients got reinfected — TV

Authors: FROM THE LIVEBLOG OF THURSDAY, AUGUST 26, 2021 7:56 pm  

Health Ministry data cited by Channel 13 suggests the Delta variant may be more effective at causing COVID reinfection among recovered patients than earlier strains of the coronavirus.

According to the data, 4,811 Israelis have been reinfected with coronavirus, accounting for 0.47 percent of the total recoveries. (The data provided refers to over 900,000 recovered Israelis, though the figure has since surpassed a million).

However, just 0.08% of the reinfection cases were recorded in 2020, while the number climbed to 0.71% in 2021 when the Delta variant became the dominant strain in Israel. In the past month, 2,702 recovered patients contracted the coronavirus again, or some 1.8%, the report says. It is unclear to what extent the Delta variant is more effective and to what extent the reinfections are the result of waning antibodies.

The majority of reinfections are among the young, according to the report.

Lack of antibodies against seasonal coronavirus OC43 nucleocapsid protein identifies patients at risk of critical COVID-19

Authors: MartinDugasa1TanjaGrote-Westrickb1UtaMerledMichaelaFontenaylmAndreas E.KremerhFrankHansesijRichardVollenbergcEvaLorentzenbShilpaTiwari-BecklerdJérômeDucheminlSyrineEllouzelMarcelVetterhJuliaFürsthPhilippSchusterkTobiasBrixaClaudia M.DenkingerfgCarstenMüller-TidoweHartmutSchmidtcJoachimKühnb1

Highlights

Does prior infection with seasonal human coronavirus OC43 protect against critical COVID-19?•

Findings: In an international multi-center study inpatients without anti-HCoV OC43 NP antibodies had an increased risk of critical disease.•

Meaning: Prior infections with seasonal HCoV OC43 have a protective effect against critical COVID-19.

Abstract

Background

The vast majority of COVID-19 patients experience a mild disease. However, a minority suffers from critical disease with substantial morbidity and mortality.

Objectives

To identify individuals at risk of critical COVID-19, the relevance of a seroreactivity against seasonal human coronaviruses was analyzed.

Methods

We conducted a multi-center non-interventional study comprising 296 patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infections from four tertiary care referral centers in Germany and France. The ICU group comprised more males, whereas the outpatient group contained a higher percentage of females. For each patient, the serum or plasma sample obtained closest after symptom onset was examined by immunoblot regarding IgG antibodies against the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of HCoV 229E, NL63, OC43 and HKU1.

Results

Median age was 60 years (range 18-96). Patients with critical disease (n=106) had significantly lower levels of anti-HCoV OC43 nucleocapsid protein (NP)-specific antibodies compared to other COVID-19 inpatients (p=0.007). In multivariate analysis (adjusted for age, sex and BMI), OC43 negative inpatients had an increased risk of critical disease (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.68 [95% CI 1.09 – 7.05]), higher than the risk by increased age or BMI, and lower than the risk by male sex. A risk stratification based on sex and OC43 serostatus was derived from this analysis.

Conclusions

Our results suggest that prior infections with seasonal human coronaviruses can protect against a severe course of COVID-19. Therefore, anti-OC43 antibodies should be measured for COVID-19 inpatients and considered as part of the risk assessment for each patient. Hence, we expect individuals tested negative for anti-OC43 antibodies to particularly benefit from vaccination against SARS-CoV-2, especially with other risk factors prevailing.

For More Information: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1386653221001141