Coronavirus (Covid-19)

A collection of articles and other resources on the Coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak, including clinical reports, management guidelines, and commentary.

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All Journal content related to the Covid-19 pandemic is freely available.

For More Information: https://www.nejm.org/coronavirus

Neurologic Manifestations Associations of COVID-19

High-quality epidemiologic data is still urgently needed to better understand neurologic effects of COVID-19.

Authors: Shraddha Mainali, MD; and Marin Darsie, MD VIEW/PRINT PDF

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection continues to prevail as a deadly pandemic and unparalleled global crisis. More than 74 million people have been infected globally, and over 1.6 million have died as of mid-December 2020. The virus transmits mainly through close contacts and respiratory droplets.1 Although the mean incubation period is 3 to 9 days (range, 0-24 days), transmission may occur prior to symptom onset, and about 18% of cases remain asymptomatic.2 The highest rates of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the US have been reported in adults age 18 to 29 and 50 to 64 years, representing 23.8% and 20.5% of cases, respectively.3 Although adults age 65 and older make up only 14.6% of total cases in the US, they account for the vast majority of deaths (79.9%).3 Similarly, men appear to be more vulnerable to the disease, accounting for 69% of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and 58% of deaths despite nearly equal disease prevalence between men and women.4 In terms of ethnicity, Black Americans account for 15.6% of COVID-19 infections and 19.7% of related deaths, whereas Hispanic/Latinx Americans account for 26.3% of COVID-19 infections and 15.7% of COVID-19 deaths, despite these groups comprising 13.4% and 16.7% of the US population, respectively.3,5

The most commonly reported symptoms are fever, dry cough, fatigue, dyspnea, and anorexia.2 Numerous studies have also reported a spectrum of neurologic dysfunctions, including mild symptoms (eg, headache, anosmia, and dysgeusia) to severe complications (eg, stroke and encephalitis). Despite the prolific reports of neurologic associations and complications of COVID-19 in the face of a raging pandemic with limited resources, there is a significant lack of control for important confounders including the severity of systemic disease, exacerbation or recrudescence of preexisting neurologic disease, iatrogenic complications, and hospital-acquired conditions. Moreover, given the ubiquity of the virus, it is challenging to parse COVID-19–related complications from coexisting conditions. There is an urgent need for high-quality epidemiologic data reflecting COVID-19 prevalence by age, sex, race, and ethnicity on a local, state, national, and international level.

Neurologic and Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of COVID-19

Prevalence estimates of acute neurologic dysfunctions caused by COVID-19 are widely variable, with reports ranging from 3.5% to 36.4%.6 A recent study from Chicago showed that in those with COVID-19 who develop neurologic complications, 42% had neurologic complaints at disease onset, 63% had them during hospitalization, and 82% experienced them during the course of illness.7 Considering the widespread nature of the pandemic, with millions infected globally, neurologic complications of COVID-19 could lead to a significant increase in morbidity, mortality, and economic burden.

People over age 50 with comorbidities (eg, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease) are prone to neurologic complications.2,8 Common nonspecific symptoms include headache, fatigue, malaise, myalgia, nausea, vomiting, confusion, anorexia, and dizziness. COVID-19 is known characteristically to affect taste (dysgeusia) and smell (anosmia) in the absence of coryza with variable prevalence estimates ranging from 5% to 85%.9 Since the first report on hospitalized individuals in Wuhan, China, numerous other reports have indicated a spectrum of mild-to-severe neurologic complications, including cerebrovascular events, seizures, demyelinating disease, and encephalitis.8,10-13 As a result of fragmented data from across the world with diverse neurologic manifestations and multiple potential mechanisms of injury, the classification of neurologic dysfunctions in COVID-19 is complex and varies across the literature. Here we present 2 pragmatic classification approaches based on 1) type and site of neurologic manifestations disease categories.

For More Information: https://practicalneurology.com/articles/2021-jan/neurologic-manifestations-associations-of-covid-19

Associations between body-mass index and COVID-19 severity in 6·9 million people in England: a prospective, community-based, cohort study

  1. Authors: Min Gao, MSc *, Carmen Piernas, PhD  , Nerys M Astbury, PhD, Prof Julia Hippisley-Cox, FRCPProf Stephen O’Rahilly, FRS, Prof Paul Aveyard, FRCGP 

Summary

Background

Obesity is a major risk factor for adverse outcomes after infection with SARS-CoV-2. We aimed to examine this association, including interactions with demographic and behavioural characteristics, type 2 diabetes, and other health conditions.

Methods

In this prospective, community-based, cohort study, we used de-identified patient-level data from the QResearch database of general practices in England, UK. We extracted data for patients aged 20 years and older who were registered at a practice eligible for inclusion in the QResearch database between Jan 24, 2020 (date of the first recorded infection in the UK) and April 30, 2020, and with available data on BMI. Data extracted included demographic, clinical, clinical values linked with Public Health England’s database of positive SARS-CoV-2 test results, and death certificates from the Office of National Statistics. Outcomes, as a proxy measure of severe COVID-19, were admission to hospital, admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), and death due to COVID-19. We used Cox proportional hazard models to estimate the risk of severe COVID-19, sequentially adjusting for demographic characteristics, behavioral factors, and comorbidities.

Findings

Among 6 910 695 eligible individuals (mean BMI 26·78 kg/m2 [SD 5·59]), 13 503 (0·20%) were admitted to hospital, 1601 (0·02%) to an ICU, and 5479 (0·08%) died after a positive test for SARS-CoV-2. We found J-shaped associations between BMI and admission to hospital due to COVID-19 (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] per kg/m2 from the nadir at BMI of 23 kg/m2 of 1·05 [95% CI 1·05–1·05]) and death (1·04 [1·04–1·05]), and a linear association across the whole BMI range with ICU admission (1·10 [1·09–1·10]). We found a significant interaction between BMI and age and ethnicity, with higher HR per kg/m2 above BMI 23 kg/m2 for younger people (adjusted HR per kg/m2 above BMI 23 kg/m2 for hospital admission 1·09 [95% CI 1·08–1·10] in 20–39 years age group vs 80–100 years group 1·01 [1·00–1·02]) and Black people than White people (1·07 [1·06–1·08] vs 1·04 [1·04–1·05]). The risk of admission to hospital and ICU due to COVID-19 associated with unit increase in BMI was slightly lower in people with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease than in those without these morbidities.

For More Information: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/landia/article/PIIS2213-8587(21)00089-9/fulltext