Study Finds Teenage Boys Six Times More Likely To Suffer Heart Problems From Vaccine Than Be Hospitalized by COVID

Authors; Paul Joseph Watson via Summit News,

Research conducted by the University of California has found that teenage boys are six times more likely to suffer from heart problems caused by the COVID-19 vaccine than to be hospitalized as a result of COVID-19 itself.

“A team led by Dr Tracy Hoeg at the University of California investigated the rate of cardiac myocarditis – heart inflammation – and chest pain in children aged 12-17 following their second dose of the vaccine,” reports the Telegraph.

“They then compared this with the likelihood of children needing hospital treatment owing to Covid-19, at times of low, moderate and high rates of hospitalisation.”

Researchers found that the risk of heart complications for boys aged 12-15 following the vaccine was 162.2 per million, which was the highest out of all the groups they looked at.

This compares to the risk of a healthy boy being hospitalized as a result of a COVID infection, which is around 26.7 per million, meaning the risk they face from the vaccine is 6.1 times higher.

Even during high risk rates of COVID, such as in January this year, the threat posed by the vaccine is 4.3 times higher, while during low risk rates, the risk of teenage boys suffering a “cardiac adverse event” from the vaccine is a whopping 22.8 times higher.

The research data was based on a study of adverse reactions suffered by teens between January and June this year.

In a sane world, such data should represent the nail in the coffin for the argument that teenagers and children should be mandated to take the coronavirus vaccine, but it obviously won’t.

In the UK, the government is pushing to vaccinate 12-15-year-olds, even without parental consent, despite the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) advising against it.

Meanwhile, in America, Los Angeles County school officials voted unanimously to mandate COVID shots for all

Ivermectin to prevent hospitalizations in patients with COVID-19 (IVERCOR-COVID19) a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Abstract

Background

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) has changed our lives. The scientific community has been investigating re-purposed treatments to prevent disease progression in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients.

Objective

To determine whether ivermectin treatment can prevent hospitalization in individuals with early COVID-19.

Design, setting and participants: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in non-hospitalized individuals with COVID-19 in Corrientes, Argentina. Patients with SARS-CoV-2 positive nasal swabs were contacted within 48 h by telephone to invite them to participate. The trial randomized 501 patients between August 19th 2020 and February 22nd 2021.

Intervention

Patients were randomized to ivermectin (N = 250) or placebo (N = 251) arms in a staggered dose, according to the patient’s weight, for 2 days.

Main outcomes and measures

The efficacy of ivermectin to prevent hospitalizations was evaluated as primary outcome. We evaluated secondary outcomes in relationship to safety and other efficacy end points.

Results

The mean age was 42 years (SD ± 15.5) and the median time since symptom onset to the inclusion was 4 days [interquartile range 3–6]. The primary outcome of hospitalization was met in 14/250 (5.6%) individuals in ivermectin group and 21/251 (8.4%) in placebo group (odds ratio 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.32–1.31; p = 0.227). Time to hospitalization was not statistically different between groups. The mean time from study enrollment to invasive mechanical ventilatory support (MVS) was 5.25 days (SD ± 1.71) in ivermectin group and 10 days (SD ± 2) in placebo group, (p = 0.019). There were no statistically significant differences in the other secondary outcomes including polymerase chain reaction test negativity and safety outcomes.

Limitations

Low percentage of hospitalization events, dose of ivermectin and not including only high-risk population.

Conclusion

Ivermectin had no significant effect on preventing hospitalization of patients with COVID-19. Patients who received ivermectin required invasive MVS earlier in their treatment. No significant differences were observed in any of the other secondary outcomes.

Trial registration

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04529525.

For More Information: https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12879-021-06348-5

Clinical Outcomes for Patients With Anosmia 1 Year After COVID-19 Diagnosis

Authors: Marion Renaud, MD1Claire Thibault, MD1Floriane Le Normand, MD1et al

Introduction

Since the pandemic was declared in early 2020, COVID-19–related anosmia quickly emerged as a telltale sign of infection.1,2 However, the time course and reversibility of COVID-19–related olfactory disorders, which may persist and negatively affect patients’ lives, require further study. To clarify the clinical course and prognosis, we followed a cohort of patients with COVID-19–related anosmia for 1 year and performed repeated olfactory function evaluations for a subset of patients.Methods

This cohort study follows the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) reporting guideline. Participants provided written informed consent. The study was approved by the ethics committee of the University Hospitals of Strasbourg.

In April 2020, we published a study1 about a cohort of patients with polymerase chain reaction–proven COVID-19 with acute smell loss (lasting >7 days). Over the course of 1 year, at 4-month intervals, patients were asked to complete a survey, and their olfactory function was assessed by psychophysical testing (the threshold and identification tests; Sniffin’ Sticks Test; Burghardt).3 Hyposmic or anosmic patients were followed until objective olfactory recovery (normal results were defined as those at or above the 10th percentile). Data analysis was performed from June 2020 to March 2021.Results

We evaluated 97 patients (67 women [69.1%]; mean [SD] age, 38.8 [11.5] years) with acute smell loss beyond 7 days. Of these patients, 51 (52.6%) underwent both subjective and objective olfactory test, and 46 (47.4%) underwent subjective assessment alone (Figure). After subjective assessment at 4 months, 23 of 51 patients (45.1%) reported full recovery of olfaction, 27 of 51 patients (52.9%) reported partial recovery, and 1 of 51 patients (2.0%) reported no recovery. On psychophysical testing, 43 of 51 patients (84.3%) were objectively normosmic, including 19 of 27 (70.0%) who self-evaluated as only partially recovered (all patients who self-reported normal return of smell were corroborated with objective testing) (Table). The remaining 8 patients (15.7%) with persistent subjective or objective loss of smell were followed up at 8 months, and an additional 6 patients became normosmic on objective testing. At 8 months, objective olfactory assessment confirmed full recovery in 49 of 51 patients (96.1%). Two patients remained hyposmic at 1 year, with persistent abnormalities (1 with abnormal olfactory threshold and 1 with parosmia causing abnormal identification). Among those who underwent subjective assessment alone, 13 of 46 patients (28.2%) reported satisfactory recovery at 4 months (7 with total and 6 with partial recovery), and the remaining 33 patients (71.7%) did so by 12 months (32 with total and 14 with partial recovery).

For More Information: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2781319

Evolution of NETosis markers and DAMPs have prognostic value in critically ill COVID-19 patients

  1. Authors: Joram HuckriedeSara Bülow AnderbergAlbert MoralesFemke de VriesMichael HultströmAnders BergqvistJosé T. Ortiz-PérezJan Willem SelsKanin WichapongMiklos LipcseyMarcel van de PollAnders LarssonTomas LutherChris ReutelingspergerPablo Garcia de FrutosRobert Frithiof & Gerry A. F. Nicolaes  Scientific Reports volume 11, Article number: 15701 (2021) Cite this article

Abstract

Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) presents with disease severities of varying degree. In its most severe form, infection may lead to respiratory failure and multi-organ dysfunction. Here we study the levels and evolution of the damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPS) cell free DNA (cfDNA), extracellular histone H3 (H3) and neutrophil elastase (NE), and the immune modulators GAS6 and AXL in relation to clinical parameters, ICU scoring systems and mortality in patients (n = 100) with severe COVID-19. cfDNA, H3, NE, GAS6 and AXL were increased in COVID-19 patients compared to controls. These measures associated with occurrence of clinical events and intensive care unit acquired weakness (ICUAW). cfDNA and GAS6 decreased in time in patients surviving to 30 days post ICU admission. A decrease of 27.2 ng/mL cfDNA during ICU stay associated with patient survival, whereas levels of GAS6 decreasing more than 4.0 ng/mL associated with survival. The presence of H3 in plasma was a common feature of COVID-19 patients, detected in 38% of the patients at ICU admission. NETosis markers cfDNA, H3 and NE correlated well with parameters of tissue damage and neutrophil counts. Furthermore, cfDNA correlated with lowest p/f ratio and a lowering in cfDNA was observed in patients with ventilator-free days.

Introduction

In severe cases, COVID-19 disease develops into acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), an acute lung injury causing patients to be dependent of ventilator support, which may be accompanied by development of multiple organ failure (MOF)1. Mortality is seen primarily in patients over the age of 652,3,4,5 and is highest for infected individuals with underlying comorbidities such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease or diabetes6,7,8. For patients who are taken into the intensive care unit (ICU), a high SOFA (sequential organ failure assessment) score and increased levels of fibrin D-dimers have been reported9 to associate with poor prognosis. Thromboembolic complications develop in 35–45% of COVID-19 patients10, including thrombotic microangiopathies and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) reminiscent of bacterial sepsis. Yet, COVID-19 has distinct features11 that point at a somewhat different pathological mechanism. The involvement of immune regulatory and hemostatic pathways appears evident, and recent findings have confirmed that the innate immune system and more in particular neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) play a role in COVID-19 disease pathogenesis. NETs, networks of DNA fibers that are decorated with proteins such as histones and elastase, are released from neutrophils to bind and neutralize viral proteins, bacteria and fungi12. While extracellular histones and NE serve a protective, antimicrobial function, they are potentially harmful to the host.

NETs are abundant in lung capillaries13 and are known to be pro-coagulant due to their intrinsic capacity to activate platelets14.

Excessive NET production, initiated by several pathways that also include complement activation13, results in collateral damage to lung tissues, a disturbed microcirculation of the lung15, loss of alveolar-capillary barrier function and further release of pro-inflammatory cytokines16.

During the preparation of this work it was reported that cellular components that are released upon cellular disruption, so-called damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and NETosis are involved in COVID-19 disease1718. This is fully in line with the observation that in ARDS, NETs contribute to disease progress19. Extracellular histones are cytotoxic DAMPs irrespective of their origin. They may appear during NETosis12,14,20 or originate from damaged tissues21, while cell free DNA (cfDNA) and the protease neutrophil elastase (NE) are released concomitantly22. Cellular free deoxyribonucleic acid (cfDNA) and histones promote proinflammatory cytokine release23,24. Histones have been shown to activate and recruit leukocytes25, damage alveolar macrophages26, activate erythrocytes27, epithelial and endothelial cells, in particular pulmonary endothelial cells28,29,30. If not cleared from circulation, cfDNA as well as histones facilitate severe systemic inflammation and worsen the clinical condition31,32. Presence of NE in plasma is associated with exacerbations, lung function decline and disease severity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bronchiectasis and cystic fibrosis33,34,35 and decrease of NE levels in bronchiectasis patients improved lung function and airway inflammation36.

At the same time that it provides a first line of defense against infections, the innate immune system initiates self-control responses to prevent damage to the host. One mechanism involved in early immunomodulation is the growth arrest-specific 6 (GAS6)/TAM ligand/receptor system37,38. The GAS6/AXL axis regulates the immune response by modulating cytokine production, inducing a reparative cellular response and by mediating efferocytosis, removing irreversibly damaged cells. The system also provides a mechanism of regulating endothelial and platelet activation and interaction39. Plasma concentrations of GAS6 and AXL increase in a diverse spectrum of inflammatory conditions40, including sepsis and septic shock; but also systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) without infection41. In several studies, GAS6 at IC admission correlated with severity of organ damage (i.e. SOFA) or with damage of specific organs41,42,43,44,45. This is also the case in viral infections46. These studies illustrate the modulatory role of the innate response provided by GAS6 and suggest that the presence of these components in plasma could be an early event in the orchestration of the immune response to viral infections.

cfDNA, extracellular histones and GAS6 are implicated in regulation of inflammatory and hemostatic pathways in the context of severe viral infections and ARDS, all of which are implicated in COVID-19. While other studies have reported the presence of DAMPs and NETosis markers in smaller COVID-19 populations, here we study a group of 100 severely ill COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Our hypothesis was twofold:

First, cfDNA, NE, histones and GAS6/AXL are activated in severe COVID-19. Second, cfDNA, NE, histones and GAS6/AXL are related to the severity of illness and reflect organ dysfunction in severe COVID-19.

For More Information: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-95209-x

Elevated level of C‐reactive protein may be an early marker to predict risk for severity of COVID‐19

Authors: Nurshad Ali 1

The outbreak of coronavirus disease‐2019 (COVID‐19) is an emerging global health threat. The healthcare workers are facing challenges in reducing the severity and mortality of COVID‐19 across the world. Severe patients with COVID‐19 are generally treated in the intensive care unit, while mild or non‐severe patients treated in the usual isolation ward of the hospital. However, there is an emerging challenge that a small subset of mild or non‐severe COVID‐19 patients develops into a severe disease course. Therefore, it is important to early identify and give the treatment of this subset of patients to reduce the disease severity and improve the outcomes of COVID‐19. Clinical studies demonstrated that altered levels of some blood markers might be linked with the degree of severity and mortality of patients with COVID‐19. 1 Of these clinical parameter, serum C‐reactive protein (CRP) has been found as an important marker that changes significantly in severe patients with COVID‐19. 3 CRP is a type of protein produced by the liver that serves as an early marker of infection and inflammation. 6 In blood, the normal concentration of CRP is less than 10 mg/L; however, it rises rapidly within 6 to 8 hours and gives the highest peak in 48 hours from the disease onset. 7 Its half‐life is about 19 hours 8 and its concentration decreases when the inflammatory stages end and the patient is healing. CRP preferably binds to phosphocholine expressed highly on the surface of damaged cells. 9 This binding makes active the classical complement pathway of the immune system and modulates the phagocytic activity to clear microbes and damaged cells from the organism. 7 When the inflammation or tissue damage is resolved, CRP concentration falls, making it a useful marker for monitoring disease severity. 7

The available studies that have determined serum concentration of CRP in patients with COVID‐19 are presented in Table 1. A significant increase of CRP was found with levels on average 20 to 50 mg/L in patients with COVID‐19. 10 12 21 Elevated levels of CRP were observed up to 86% in severe COVID‐19 patients. 10 11 13 Patients with severe disease courses had a far elevated level of CRP than mild or non‐severe patients. For example, a study reported that patients with more severe symptoms had on average CRP concentration of 39.4 mg/L and patients with mild symptoms CRP concentration of 18.8 mg/L. 12 CRP was found at increased levels in the severe group at the initial stage than those in the mild group. 1 In another study, the mean concentration of CRP was significantly higher in severe patients (46 mg/L) than non‐severe patients (23 mg/L). 21 The patients who died from COVID‐19 had about 10 fold higher levels of CRP than the recovered patients (median 100 vs 9.6 mg/L). 16 A recent study showed that about 7.7% of non‐severe COVID‐19 patients were progressed to severe disease courses after hospitalization, 3 and compared to non‐severe cases, the aggravated patients had significantly higher concentrations of CRP (median 43.8 vs 12.1 mg/L). A significant association was observed between CRP concentrations and the aggravation of non‐severe patients with COVID‐19 [1], and the authors proposed CRP as a suitable marker for anticipating the aggravation probability of non‐severe COVID‐19 patients, with an optimal threshold value of 26.9 mg/L. 3 The authors also noted that the risk of developing severe events is increased by 5% for every one‐unit increase in CRP concentration in patients with COVID‐19.

For More Information: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7301027/

High sensitivity troponin and COVID-19 outcomes

Authors: Nikolaos Papageorgiou,a,bCatrin Sohrabi,aDavid Prieto Merino,c,dAngelos Tyrlis,aAbed Elfattah Atieh,aBunny Saberwal,aWei-Yao Lim,aAntonio Creta,aMohammed Khanji,aReni Rusinova,aBashistraj Chooneea,aRaj Khiani,d,eNadeev Wijesuriya,e,fAnna Chow,e,fHaroun Butt,e,fStefan Browne,e,fNikhil Joshi,e,fJamie Kay,e,fSyed Ahsan,a and Rui Providenciaa,g

Abstract

Background

Recent reports have demonstrated high troponin levels in patients affected with COVID-19. In the present study, we aimed to determine the association between admission and peak troponin levels and COVID-19 outcomes.

Methods

This was an observational multi-ethnic multi-centre study in a UK cohort of 434 patients admitted and diagnosed COVID-19 positive, across six hospitals in London, UK during the second half of March 2020.

Results

Myocardial injury, defined as positive troponin during admission was observed in 288 (66.4%) patients. Age (OR: 1.68 [1.49–1.88], p < .001), hypertension (OR: 1.81 [1.10–2.99], p = .020) and moderate chronic kidney disease (OR: 9.12 [95% CI: 4.24–19.64], p < .001) independently predicted myocardial injury. After adjustment, patients with positive peak troponin were more likely to need non-invasive and mechanical ventilation (OR: 2.40 [95% CI: 1.27–4.56], p = .007, and OR: 6.81 [95% CI: 3.40–13.62], p < .001, respectively) and urgent renal replacement therapy (OR: 4.14 [95% CI: 1.34–12.78], p = .013). With regards to events, and after adjustment, positive peak troponin levels were independently associated with acute kidney injury (OR: 6.76 [95% CI: 3.40–13.47], p < .001), venous thromboembolism (OR: 11.99 [95% CI: 3.20–44.88], p < .001), development of atrial fibrillation (OR: 10.66 [95% CI: 1.33–85.32], p = .026) and death during admission (OR: 2.40 [95% CI: 1.34–4.29], p = .003). Similar associations were observed for admission troponin. In addition, median length of stay in days was shorter for patients with negative troponin levels: 8 (5–13) negative, 14 (7–23) low-positive levels and 16 (10–23) high-positive (p < .001).

Conclusions

Admission and peak troponin appear to be predictors for cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular events and outcomes in COVID-19 patients, and their utilization may have an impact on patient management.

For More Information: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7970632/

Clinical utility of cardiac troponin measurement in COVID-19 infection

Authors: David C Gaze 1 2

Abstract

The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 causes the disease COVID-19, a severe acute respiratory syndrome. COVID-19 is now a global pandemic and public health emergency due to rapid human-to-human transmission. The impact is far-reaching, with enforced social distancing and isolation, detrimental effects on individual physical activity and mental wellbeing, education in the young and economic impact to business. Whilst most COVID-19 patients demonstrate mild-to-moderate symptoms, those with severe disease progression are at a higher risk of mortality. As more is learnt about this novel disease, it is becoming evident that comorbid cardiovascular disease is associated with a greater severity and increased mortality. Many patients positive for COVID-19 demonstrate increased concentrations of cardiac troponin, creating confusion in clinical interpretation. While myocardial infarction is associated with acute infectious respiratory disease, the majority of COVID-19 patients demonstrate stable cTn rather than the dynamically changing values indicative of an acute coronary syndrome. Although full understanding of the mechanism of cTn release in COVID-19 is currently lacking, this mini-review assesses the limited published literature with a view to offering insight to pathophysiological mechanisms and reported treatment regimens.

For More Information: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32255359/

Cardiac Troponin-I and COVID-19: A Prognostic Tool for In-Hospital Mortality

Authors: Baher Al Abbasi 1Pedro Torres 1Fergie Ramos-Tuarez 2Nakeya Dewaswala 1Ahmed Abdallah 1Kai Chen 1Mohamed Abdul Qader 1Riya Job 1Samar Aboulenain 1Karolina Dziadkowiec 1Huzefa Bhopalwala 3Jesus E Pino 2Robert D Chait 2

Abstract

Background: The number of fatalities due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is escalating with more than 800,000 deaths globally. The scientific community remains in urgent need of prognostic tools to determine the probability of survival in patients with COVID-19 and to determine the need for hospitalization.

Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study of patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19 admitted to a tertiary center between March 2020 and July 2020. Patients age 18 years and older were stratified into two groups based on their troponin-I level in the first 24 h of admission (groups: elevated vs. normal). The aim of the study is to explore the utility of cardiac troponin-I level for early prognostication of patients with COVID-19.

Results: This cohort of 257 patients included 122/257 (47%) women with a mean age of 63 ± 17 years. Patients with an elevated troponin-I level were more likely to be older (77 ± 13 vs. 58 ± 16 years, P < 0.0001), have a history of hypertension (P < 0.0001), diabetes mellitus (P = 0.0019), atrial fibrillation or flutter (P = 0.0009), coronary artery disease (P < 0.0001), and chronic heart failure (P = 0.0011). Patients with an elevated troponin-I level in the first 24 h of admission were more likely to have higher in-hospital mortality (52% vs. 10%, P < 0.0001). Troponin-I level in the first 24 h of admission had a negative predictive value of 89.7% and a positive predictive value of 51.9% for all-cause in-hospital mortality.

Conclusions: Troponin-I elevation is commonly seen in patients with COVID-19 and is significantly associated with fatal outcomes. However, a normal troponin-I level in the first 24 h of admission had a high negative predictive value for all-cause in-hospital mortality, thereby predicting favorable survival at the time of discharge.

For More Information: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33224386/