NIH orders $1.67M study on how COVID-19 vaccine impacts menstrual cycle

Authors: By Hannah Sparks September 7, 2021

The National Institutes of Health has announced a $1.67 million study to investigate reports that suggest the COVID-19 vaccine may come with an unexpected impact on reproductive health.

It’s been a little over six months since the three COVID-19 vaccines in the US — Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson — became widely available to all adults. But even in the early days of vaccine rollout, some women were noticing irregular periods following their shots, as reported first by the Lily in April.

Shana Clauson, 45, spoke to the Washington Post’s women’s news site at the time, and again this week, about her experience after getting the jab — revealing that her period arrived earlier and heavier than what she considers normal. She was one of many who gathered on social media to share what they were seeing.

“Is this not being discussed, or is it even being looked at or researched because it’s a ‘woman’s issue?’ ” Clauson speculated to the Lily last spring.

Women, those under 40 more likely to have side effects to COVID vaccine, expert says

It would appear that the NIH heard Clauson and others’ reports, as they announced on Aug. 30 that they intended to embark on just such research — aiming to incorporate up to half a million participants, including teens and transgender and nonbinary people.

Researchers at Boston University, Harvard Medical School, Johns Hopkins University, Michigan State University and Oregon Health and Science University have been enlisted to embark on the study, commissioned by the NIH’s National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and the Office of Research on Women’s Health.

The approximately yearlong study will follow initially unvaccinated participants to observe changes that occur following each dose. More specifically, some groups will exclude participants on birth control or gender-affirming hormones, which may have their own impact on periods.

“Our goal is to provide menstruating people with information, mainly as to what to expect, because I think that was the biggest issue: Nobody expected it to affect the menstrual system, because the information wasn’t being collected in the early vaccine studies,” said NICHD director Diana Bianchi in a statement to the Lily — reportedly crediting their early coverage for helping to make the NIH aware.

‘We were worried this was contributing to vaccine hesitancy in reproductive-age women.’

NICHD director Diana Bianchi

The NIH suggests that changes to the menstrual cycle could arise out of several of life’s circumstances during a pandemic — the stress of lifestyle changes or possibly contending with illness. Moreover, the immune and reproductive systems are intrinsically linked, and the notion that the immune-boosting vaccine may disrupt the typical menstrual cycle is plausible, as demonstrated by previous studies concerning vaccine uptake.

It’s also worth noting the vaccine does not cause infertility and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the shot even for pregnant women.

As changes to the menstrual cycle are “really not a life and death issue,” explained Bianchi, the Food and Drug Administration — fast-tracking their work — prioritized only the most critical risks associated with the COVID-19 vaccine.

The NIH, too, pulled together the initiative at breakneck speed. Funding for such a study would typically take years to see approval.

“We were worried this was contributing to vaccine hesitancy in reproductive-age women,” said Bianchi.

Biden team’s misguided and deadly COVID-19 vaccine strategy

Vaccination ‘arms race’ could prove dangerous to the American public

Authors: Dr. Robert Malone and Peter Navarro

The Biden administration’s strategy to universally vaccinate in the middle of the pandemic is bad science and badly needs a reboot.

This strategy will likely prolong the most dangerous phase of the worst pandemic since 1918 and almost assuredly cause more harm than good – even as it undermines faith in the entire public health system.

Four flawed assumptions drive the Biden strategy. The first is that universal vaccination can eradicate the virus and secure economic recovery by achieving herd immunity throughout the country (and the world).  However, the virus is now so deeply embedded in the world population that, unlike polio and smallpox, eradication is unachievable. SARS-CoV-2 and its myriad mutations will likely continually circulate, much like the common cold and influenza.

The second assumption is that the vaccines are (near) perfectly effective. However, our currently available vaccines are quite “leaky.” While good at preventing severe disease and death, they only reduce, not eliminate, the risk of infection, replication, and transmission. As a slide deck from the Centers for Disease Control has revealed, even 100% acceptance of the current leaky vaccines combined with strict mask compliance will not stop the highly contagious Delta variant from spreading.

The third assumption is that the vaccines are safe.  Yet scientists, physicians, and public health officials now recognize risks that are rare but by no means trivial.  Known side effects include serious cardiac and thrombotic conditions, menstrual cycle disruptions, Bell’s Palsy, Guillain Barre syndrome, and anaphylaxis.

Unknown side effects which virologists fear may emerge include existential reproductive risks, additional autoimmune conditions, and various forms of disease enhancement, i.e., the vaccines can make people more vulnerable to reinfection by SARS-CoV-2 or reactivation of latent viral infections and associated diseases such as shingles.  With good reason, the FDA has yet to approve the vaccines now administered under Emergency Use Authorization.

The failure of the fourth “durability” assumption is the most alarming and perplexing.  It now appears our current vaccines are likely to offer a mere 180-day window of protection – a decided lack of durability underscored by scientific evidence from Israel and confirmed by  Pfizer, the Department of Health and Human Services, and other countries. 

For More Information: https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2021/aug/5/biden-teams-misguided-and-deadly-covid-19-vaccine-/

OBGYN explains why a COVID vaccine might affect menstrual cycles

Authors: Kate Larsen

SAN FRANCISCO — Anecdotal evidence from women around the country has led to questions about how COVID-19 vaccines may affect women’s menstrual cycles.

When ABC7 News reporter, Kate Larsen, posted the question on social media, it became clear that a lot of women are experiencing cycle changes, and are wondering if it’s related to the vaccine.

Women wrote:

“I had my 1st COVID-19 vaccine in January followed by the 2nd in February, and since then I have had hemorrhagic bleeding with clots. This month of April was the heaviest.”

“I thought I was going crazy, and even went as far as making a doctor’s appt and switching out my BC because mine is so heavy now and its been a month straight”

“I received the Moderna vaccine in January and February I didn’t get my period for 3 months they did multiple blood test, pregnancy test and ultrasounds but everything came back normal. Then finally on April 4 I got my period and it’s been super heavy for the past 22 days non-stop.”

And some women are reporting other changes: “My period has been the lightest in years for the past 2 cycles. Was beginning to wonder if I was pushed into pre-menopause. Also my PMS symptoms haven’t been as bad from what I can tell.”

For More Information: https://abc7ny.com/menstrual-cycles-and-covid-vaccine-side-effects-women-coronavirus-period/10552668/