Long COVID’s daunting toll seen in study of pandemic’s earliest patients

Authors: Melissa Healy   6 hrs ago

COVID-19 patients in Wuhan were among the pandemic’s first victims, and a comprehensive new study finds that a year after shaking the coronavirus, survivors were more likely than their uninfected peers to suffer from mobility problems, pain or discomfort, anxiety and depression.

detailed accounting of 1,276 people hospitalized for COVID-19 in the pandemic’s opening months reveals that a full year later, almost half continued to report at least one lingering health problem that is now considered a symptom of “long COVID.”

One out of five said they had continued fatigue and/or muscle weakness, and 17% said they were still experiencing sleep difficulties. Just over one in four said they were suffering anxiety or depression in the wake of their bout with the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

For the growing number of patients who identify themselves as COVID “long haulers,” the new accounting offers cause for optimism — and concern. The period from six to 12 months after infection brought improvement for many. But most patients struggling with symptoms at the six-month mark were not yet well six months later.

The findings, catalogued by a team of Chinese researchers, were published late Thursday in the medical journal Lancet.

“This is not good news,” said David Putrino, a rehabilitation specialist who works with COVID long haulers at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. “If you run the numbers here, about one-third of the group that had persistent symptoms are getting better after 12 months, while two-thirds are not.”

Putrino also called the findings a “wake-up call” to public health officials that even when the pandemic is over — a distant enough prospect in the midst of a fourth wave of infections — its downstream consequences will not be.

“We’re going to need resources for many years to come to deal with these patients,” he said.

There will be a lot of them. More than 87,000 COVID-19 patients are being hospitalized each day in the United States, and 2.7 million have receiving hospital care in the past year alone.

The half who contend with persistent symptoms will show up in doctors’ offices with clusters of vague and perplexing complaints including brain fog, heart palpitations, pain and exhaustion. And despite emerging evidence that time and specialized treatment can help many to improve, few will have the wherewithal to spend months in intensive rehabilitation for their symptoms, Putrino said.

An editorial published alongside the new study noted that only 0.4% of COVID long haulers are receiving rehabilitative treatment for their symptoms.

Even as scientists puzzle over the common biological mechanisms of long COVID’s diverse symptoms, healthcare providers “must acknowledge and validate the toll of the persistent symptoms of long COVID on patients, and health systems need to be prepared to meet individualised, patient-oriented goals, with an appropriately trained workforce,” Lancet’s editors wrote.

The new research also offered some glimmers of hope.

When the study’s COVID-19 patients were examined at six months, 68% said they had at least one of 15 symptoms considered hallmarks of long COVID, which is also known as Post-Acute Sequelae of COVID, or PASC. At one year, 49% were still afflicted by at least one of those symptoms.

The proportion of patients with ongoing muscle weakness and fatigue dropped from 52% to 20% during that time. Patients experiencing loss of smell dropped from 11% to 4%, and those afflicted with sleep problems fell from 27% to 17%. The 22% who reported hair loss at six months dwindled to 11% a full year out.

At the same time, the numbers of patients reporting breathing difficulties saw a slight increase, rising from 26% at six months to 30% after a year. Likewise, patients who reported new depression or anxiety increased from 23% to 26% during that period.

Study co-author Xiaoying Gu from the China-Japan Friendship Hospital in Beijing said the slight uptick in anxiety and depression was, like all of long COVID’s symptoms, hard to explain.

The psychiatric symptoms “could be caused by a biological process linked to the virus infection itself, or the body’s immune response to it,” he said. “Or they could be linked to reduced social contact, loneliness, incomplete recovery of physical health or loss of employment associated with illness.”

Patients who required mechanical ventilation were more likely than those with less severe illness to have measurable lung impairment and abnormal chest X-rays at both six and 12 months.

But in the tally of more subjective long COVID symptoms, the difference between the most severely ill and those who required no supplemental oxygen at all was very small.

That finding underscores the fact that even patients who are only mildly ill are at risk of developing a range of persistent symptoms.

Of the study population’s 479 patients who held jobs when the pandemic struck, 88% had returned to work a year after their illness. Most of the 57 who did not return said they either could not or were unwilling to do the tasks required of them.

The findings from the Wuhan patients also tracked with the widespread observation that persistent post-COVID infection symptoms are more common in women than in men. Women who had been hospitalized for COVID-19 were twice as likely as their male counterparts to report depression or anxiety 12 months later. In addition, they were close to three times as likely to show evidence of impaired lung function, and 43% more likely to report symptoms of fatigue and muscle weakness.

All of the study’s participants were treated at a single hospital in Wuhan, where reports of a mysterious new form of pneumonia first surfaced in December 2019. The researchers followed a large group of patients sickened in the first five months that the outbreak.

That makes the Lancet report one of the earliest and largest accounts of lingering COVID-19 symptoms to be tallied and vetted by other researchers, and the only one to compare such patients to a group of uninfected peers matched on a wide range of demographic and health attributes.

One thing is already clear, the journal editors noted: “Long COVID is a modern medical challenge of the first order.”

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.

Assessment of the Frequency and Variety of Persistent Symptoms Among Patients With COVID-19A Systematic Review

Authors: Tahmina Nasserie, MPH1Michael Hittle, BS1Steven N. Goodman, MD, MHS, PhD1 JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(5):e2111417. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.11417 May 26, 2021

Key Points

Question  What are the frequency and variety of persistent symptoms after COVID-19 infection?

Findings  In this systematic review of 45 studies including 9751 participants with COVID-19, the median proportion of individuals who experienced at least 1 persistent symptom was 73%; symptoms occurring most frequently included shortness of breath or dyspnea, fatigue or exhaustion, and sleep disorders or insomnia. However, the studies were highly heterogeneous and needed longer follow-up and more standardized designs.

Meaning  This systematic review found that COVID-19 symptoms commonly persisted beyond the acute phase of infection, with implications for health-associated functioning and quality of life; however, methodological improvements are needed to reliably quantify these risks.Abstract

Importance  Infection with COVID-19 has been associated with long-term symptoms, but the frequency, variety, and severity of these complications are not well understood. Many published commentaries have proposed plans for pandemic control that are primarily based on mortality rates among older individuals without considering long-term morbidity among individuals of all ages. Reliable estimates of such morbidity are important for patient care, prognosis, and development of public health policy.

Objective  To conduct a systematic review of studies examining the frequency and variety of persistent symptoms after COVID-19 infection.

Evidence Review  A search of PubMed and Web of Science was conducted to identify studies published from January 1, 2020, to March 11, 2021, that examined persistent symptoms after COVID-19 infection. Persistent symptoms were defined as those persisting for at least 60 days after diagnosis, symptom onset, or hospitalization or at least 30 days after recovery from the acute illness or hospital discharge. Search terms included COVID-19SARS-CoV-2coronavirus2019-nCoVlong-termafter recoverylong-haulpersistentoutcomesymptomfollow-up, and longitudinal. All English-language articles that presented primary data from cohort studies that reported the prevalence of persistent symptoms among individuals with SARS-CoV-2 infection and that had clearly defined and sufficient follow-up were included. Case reports, case series, and studies that described symptoms only at the time of infection and/or hospitalization were excluded. A structured framework was applied to appraise study quality.

Findings  A total of 1974 records were identified; of those, 1247 article titles and abstracts were screened. After removal of duplicates and exclusions, 92 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility; 47 studies were deemed eligible, and 45 studies reporting 84 clinical signs or symptoms were included in the systematic review. Of 9751 total participants, 5266 (54.0%) were male; 30 of 45 studies reported mean or median ages younger than 60 years. Among 16 studies, most of which comprised participants who were previously hospitalized, the median proportion of individuals experiencing at least 1 persistent symptom was 72.5% (interquartile range [IQR], 55.0%-80.0%). Individual symptoms occurring most frequently included shortness of breath or dyspnea (26 studies; median frequency, 36.0%; IQR, 27.6%-50.0%), fatigue or exhaustion (25 studies; median frequency, 40.0%; IQR, 31.0%-57.0%), and sleep disorders or insomnia (8 studies; median 29.4%, IQR, 24.4%-33.0%). There were wide variations in the design and quality of the studies, which had implications for interpretation and often limited direct comparability and combinability. Major design differences included patient populations, definitions of time zero (ie, the beginning of the follow-up interval), follow-up lengths, and outcome definitions, including definitions of illness severity.

Conclusions and Relevance  This systematic review found that COVID-19 symptoms commonly persisted beyond the acute phase of infection, with implications for health-associated functioning and quality of life. Current studies of symptom persistence are highly heterogeneous, and future studies need longer follow-up, improved quality, and more standardized designs to reliably quantify risks.

For More Information: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2780376

Covid-19 Vaccine Analysis: The most common adverse events reported so far

Authors: DATED: AUGUST 6, 2021 BY SHARYL ATTKISSON 

As of July 19, 2021 there were 419,513 adverse event reports associated with Covid-19 vaccination in the U.S., with a total of 1,814,326 symptoms reported. That’s according to the federal Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) database.

Report an adverse event after vaccination online here.

Each symptom reported does not necessarily equal one patient. Adverse event reports often include multiple symptoms for a single patient.

Reporting of illnesses and symptoms that occur after Covid-19 vaccination does not necessarily mean they were caused by the vaccine. The system is designed to collect adverse events that occur after vaccination to uncover any patterns of illnesses that were not captured during vaccine studies.

Read CDC info on Covid-19 vaccine here.

Scientists have estimated that adverse events occur at a rate many fold higher than what is reported in VAERS, since it is assumed that most adverse events are not reported through the tracking system. Reports can be made by doctors, patients or family members and/or acquaintances, or vaccine industry representatives. 

Read: Exclusive summary: Covid-19 vaccine concerns.

Some observers claim Covid-19 vaccine adverse events are not as likely to be underreported as those associated with other medicine, due to close monitoring and widespread publicity surrounding Covid-19 vaccination.

Approximately 340 million doses of Covid-19 vaccine have been given in the U.S. Slightly less than half of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the benefits of Covid-19 vaccine outweigh the risks for all groups and age categories authorized to receive it.

Watch: CDC disinformation re: studies on Covid-19 vaccine effectiveness in people who have had Covid-19.

The following is a summary of some of the most frequent adverse events reported to VAERS after Covid-19 vaccination. (It is not the entire list.)

Most common Covid-19 vaccine adverse events reported as of July 19, 2021

Yellow highlighted adverse events are subjects of investigations, warnings or stated concerns by public health officials. For details, click here.

128,370 Muscle, bone, joint pain and swelling including:

  • 39,902 Pain in extremity
  • 37,819 Myalgia, muscle pain, weakness, fatigue, spasms, disorders, related
  • 30,138 Arthralgia, joint pain or arthritis, swelling, joint disease, bone pain, spinal osteoarthritis
  • 14,682 Back pain, neck pain
  • 5,829 Muscle and skeletal pain, stiffness, weakness

119,866 Injection site pain, bleeding, hardening, bruising, etc.

105,332 Skin reddening, at injection site or elsewhere, rash, hives

100,564 Fatigue, lethargy, malaise, asthenia, abnormal weakness, loss of energy

89,302 Headache, incl. migraine, sinus

68,252 Vomiting, nausea

68,064 Fever

63,133 Chills

60,913 Pain

49,574 Dizziness

34,076 Flushing, hot flush, feeling hot, abnormally warm skin

31,785 Lung pain or abnormalities, fluid in lung, respiratory tract or lung congestion or infection, wheezing, acute respiratory failure including:

  • 23,005 Dyspnoea, difficulty breathing
  • 1,398 Pneumonia
  • 1,128 Respiratory arrest, failure, stopped or inefficient breathing, abnormal breathing
  • 563 Covid-19 pneumonia
  • 265 Mechanical ventilation
  • 217 Bronchitis

30,909 Skin swelling, pain, tightness, face swelling, swelling under skin, hives, angioedema including:

  • 7,579 Skin pain, sensitivity, burning, discoloration, tenderness

25,319 Heart failure, heart rhythm and rate abnormalities, atrial fibrillation, palpitations, flutter, murmur, pacemaker added, fluid in heart, abnormal echocardiogram including:

  • 3,105 Heart attack or cardiac arrest, sudden loss of blood flow from failure to pump to heart effectively, cardiac failure, disorder

22,085 Itchiness

29,861 Sensory disturbance including:

  • 8,236 Tinnitus, hearing noise
  • 7,951 Abnormal vision, blindness
  • 6,349 Ageusia, loss of taste, altered taste, disorders
  • 2,249 Anosmia, loss of smell, parosmia (rotten smell)
  • 2,075 Hypersensitivity
  • 1,560 Sensitivity or reaction to light 
  • 890 Hearing loss, deafness

More than 50 Long-Term Effects of COVID-19: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Authors: López-León SWegman-Ostrosky TPerelman CSepulveda RRebolledo PACuapio AVillapol S Preprint from SSRN, 20 Jan 2021

Abstract 


Background: COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, can involve sequelae that last weeks to months after initial recovery. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to identify studies assessing the long-term effects of COVID-19 and estimate the prevalence of each symptom, sign, or laboratory parameters of patients at a post-COVID-19 stage.

Methods: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, LitCOVID (PubMed and Medline) and Embase were searched by two independent researchers. Studies published before 1st of January 2021 and with a minimum of 100 patients were included. For effects reported in two or more studies, meta-analyses using a random-effects model were performed using the MetaXL software to estimate the pooled prevalence with 95% CI. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistics. PRISMA guidelines were followed.

Findings: A total of 18,251 publications were identified, of which 15 met the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of 55 long-term effects was estimated, 21 meta-analyses were performed, and 47,910 patients were included. The follow-up time ranged from 15 to 110 days post-viral infection. The age of the study participants ranged between 17 and 87 years. It was estimated that 80% (95% CI 65-92) of the patients that were infected with SARS-CoV-2 developed one or more symptoms. The five most common symptoms were fatigue (58%), headache (44%), attention disorder (27%), hair loss (25%), and dyspnea (24%). In order to have a better understanding, there is a need for studies to stratify by sex, age, previous comorbidities, severity of COVID-19 (including asymptomatic), and duration of each symptom.

Interpretation: From the clinical perspective, multi-disciplinary teams are crucial to developing preventive measures, rehabilitation techniques, and clinical management strategies with whole-patient perspectives designed to address after-COVID-19 care.

Funding: National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX.

Declaration of Interests: SLL is an employee of Novartis Pharmaceutical Company; the statements presented in the paper do not necessarily represent the position of the company. The remaining authors have no competing interests to declare.

For More Information: https://europepmc.org/article/PPR/PPR280403

Post-acute COVID-19 syndrome

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the pathogen responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has resulted in global healthcare crises and strained health resources. As the population of patients recovering from COVID-19 grows, it is paramount to establish an understanding of the healthcare issues surrounding them. COVID-19 is now recognized as a multi-organ disease with a broad spectrum of manifestations. Similarly to post-acute viral syndromes described in survivors of other virulent coronavirus epidemics, there are increasing reports of persistent and prolonged effects after acute COVID-19. Patient advocacy groups, many members of which identify themselves as long haulers, have helped contribute to the recognition of post-acute COVID-19, a syndrome characterized by persistent symptoms and/or delayed or long-term complications beyond 4 weeks from the onset of symptoms. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on post-acute COVID-19, its pathophysiology and its organ-specific sequelae. Finally, we discuss relevant considerations for the multidisciplinary care of COVID-19 survivors and propose a framework for the identification of those at high risk for post-acute COVID-19 and their coordinated management through dedicated COVID-19 clinics.

Main

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the pathogen responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has caused morbidity and mortality at an unprecedented scale globally1. Scientific and clinical evidence is evolving on the subacute and long-term effects of COVID-19, which can affect multiple organ systems2. Early reports suggest residual effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection, such as fatigue, dyspnea, chest pain, cognitive disturbances, arthralgia and decline in quality of life3,4,5. Cellular damage, a robust innate immune response with inflammatory cytokine production, and a pro-coagulant state induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection may contribute to these sequelae6,7,8. Survivors of previous coronavirus infections, including the SARS epidemic of 2003 and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak of 2012, have demonstrated a similar constellation of persistent symptoms, reinforcing concern for clinically significant sequelae of COVID-19 (refs. 9,10,11,12,13,14,15).

Systematic study of sequelae after recovery from acute COVID-19 is needed to develop an evidence-based multidisciplinary team approach for caring for these patients, and to inform research priorities. A comprehensive understanding of patient care needs beyond the acute phase will help in the development of infrastructure for COVID-19 clinics that will be equipped to provide integrated multispecialty care in the outpatient setting. While the definition of the post-acute COVID-19 timeline is evolving, it has been suggested to include persistence of symptoms or development of sequelae beyond 3 or 4 weeks from the onset of acute symptoms of COVID-19 (refs. 16,17), as replication-competent SARS-CoV-2 has not been isolated after 3 weeks18. For the purpose of this review, we defined post-acute COVID-19 as persistent symptoms and/or delayed or long-term complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection beyond 4 weeks from the onset of symptoms (Fig. 1). Based on recent literature, it is further divided into two categories: (1) subacute or ongoing symptomatic COVID-19, which includes symptoms and abnormalities present from 4–12 weeks beyond acute COVID-19; and (2) chronic or post-COVID-19 syndrome, which includes symptoms and abnormalities persisting or present beyond 12 weeks of the onset of acute COVID-19 and not attributable to alternative diagnoses17,19. Herein, we summarize the epidemiology and organ-specific sequelae of post-acute COVID-19 and address management considerations for the interdisciplinary comprehensive care of these patients in COVID-19 clinics 

For More Information: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-021-01283-z

Long-Haul COVID

 Authors: Avindra Nath

Modern medicine has faced its biggest challenge from the smallest of organisms. It is becoming increasingly apparent that many patients who recovered from the acute phase of the SARS-CoV-2 infection have persistent symptoms. This includes clouding of mentation, sleep disturbances, exercise intolerance and autonomic symptoms (table 1). Some also complain of persistent low grade fever and lymphadenopathy. Although there are no peer reviewed papers at the moment on these patients, many news articles have been written about this phenomenon1,,4 and there are Facebook groups with several thousand patients describing these symptoms. They call the illness, “Long-Haul COVID” or “Long-tail COVID.” Many of these patients are health care workers who had massive exposure to the virus early in the pandemic and describe having symptoms for “100+ days.”5

Most of these patients were in excellent health prior to getting infected with SARS-CoV-2. They all had a myriad of symptoms during the acute phase. However as the fever and respiratory symptoms improved, they are left with persistent systemic symptoms some of which are gradually improving but not all are following that course. Still others feel they had nearly recovered from the acute illness and then a few days later, developed a plethora of symptoms that are now persisting. Some describe a cyclical nature to their symptoms where they improve and then worsen every few days. While some were admitted to the hospital due to pulmonary symptoms, the majority were isolated at home. Access to testing and medical care has been limited and most appointments with physicians are being done via telemedicine which has its limitations. Some patients have had extensive testing by internists, infectious disease specialists, cardiologists and pulmonary medicine experts but nothing has been found to explain the symptoms.5 These patients, some of whom are physicians themselves are concerned that they could be stigmatized as being “functional.” Many of these symptoms overlap with those of patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS).6,7 However one needs to be careful not jump to the conclusion that they have ME/CFS unless other possible causes of their symptoms have been investigated (table 2).

Table 2

The cause of ME/CFS remains unknown despite decades of research on the syndrome. Many patients with ME/CFS similarly report a viral infection as a trigger but since they come to our attention often years after symptom onset, it is impossible to know what may have triggered the symptoms.8 Long-Haul COVID thus represents an excellent opportunity to study the pathophysiology of ME/CFS and in doing so may have broader implications.

For More Information: https://n.neurology.org/content/95/13/559

The Problem of ‘Long Haul’ COVID

More and more patients are dealing with major symptoms that linger for months

Authors: By Carolyn Barber on December 29, 2020

It was just a couple of months into the pandemic when patients in online support groups began describing the phenomenon. In some emergency departments, they said, their complaints were largely being dismissed—or at the very least diminished—by health care professionals. The patients felt they were not being heard, or perhaps even were outright disbelieved.

The common thread through these comments was a basic one. Each of the patients had already been infected with COVID-19 and presumably had recovered, yet each was still dealing with symptoms of the disease—sometimes vague, sometimes nonspecific—that simply would not go away. Physicians and nurses, already overloaded with emergent cases of the virus, were baffled, often searching for other, more benign explanations for what they were being told.

We now have a term for those patients—and the truth is, “long hauler” only begins to describe the COVID-related ordeals they are enduring. Of all the facets of the virus we have dealt with in 2020, this one may ultimately prove the most difficult to recognize, much less combat.

Long-haul COVID patients carry their symptoms well beyond what we’ve come to understand as a “normal” course of recovery. It can last for weeks. For some long haulers, it has been months—and counting. And to the consternation of physicians and nurses on the front lines, the symptoms of these patients often present as so varied and relatively common that they defy a solid COVID-related diagnosis.

If a patient comes to the emergency department (E.D.) complaining of dizziness, forgetfulness and headache, for example, is that long-haul COVID or something else entirely? How about fatigue? A persistent cough? Muscle aches and insomnia? Relapsing fevers?

With little to go on, and lacking clinical guidance, some of us in the E.D. have instructed our patients to go home, get more rest, “try to relax.” We’ve offered reassurances that everything would be okay with more time, checked off the final diagnosis box for something like anxiety or chronic fatigue on our computers, and moved on to see our next patients.


But there’s a growing body of evidence to suggest that a surprising number of people are, in fact, COVID long haulers, and that hospital emergency departments and clinics may be dealing with them for months and months to come.

For More Information: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-problem-of-long-haul-covid/

Reactogenicity Following Receipt of mRNA-Based COVID-19 Vaccines

Authors: Johanna Chapin-Bardales, PhD, MPH1Julianne Gee, MPH1Tanya Myers, PhD, MSc1

In December 2020, 2 mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna) were granted Emergency Use Authorization by the US Food and Drug Administration as 2-dose series and recommended for use by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.13 In late February 2021, the US Food and Drug Administration granted Emergency Use Authorization for a third COVID-19 vaccine, a single-dose adenovirus vector-based vaccine from Janssen (Johnson & Johnson).

In clinical trials of the mRNA-based 2-dose vaccines, participants reported local and systemic reactions (reactogenicity).4,5 Frequently reported reactions included injection site pain, fatigue, and headache; greater reactogenicity was reported following the second dose.4,5 Continued monitoring of reactogenicity of COVID-19 vaccines outside of clinical trial settings may provide additional information for health care practitioners and the public about transient local and systemic reactions following COVID-19 vaccination.

V-safe Active Surveillance System

To facilitate rapid assessment of COVID-19 vaccines, in 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established v-safe, a new active surveillance system for collecting near–real-time data from COVID-19 vaccine recipients in the US. V-safe participants voluntarily self-enroll and receive periodic smartphone text messages to initiate web-based health surveys from the day of vaccination (day 0) through 12 months after the final dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.6 From day 0 through day 7 after each vaccine dose, participants are asked questions about solicited local and systemic reactions (eg, injection site pain, fatigue, headache). These solicited reactions do not include allergic reactions or anaphylaxis; however, v-safe does allow participants to enter free-text information about their postvaccination experience and asks about adverse health events (eg, received medical care). Medically attended events are followed up on through active telephone outreach; future analyses will address these adverse vaccine experiences. This report describes information on solicited local and systemic reactogenicity reported to v-safe on days 0 to 7 after each dose of vaccine from December 14, 2020, through February 28, 2021. Responses were limited to individuals who were vaccinated by February 21, 2021, to allow a 7-day reporting period after the day of vaccination. Preliminary data from v-safe through January 13, 2021, have been previously reported.7 This activity was reviewed by the CDC and was conducted consistent with applicable federal law and CDC policy (see Additional Information).

Self-reported Local and Systemic Reactions Among V-safe Participants

By February 21, 2021, more than 46 million persons received at least 1 dose of an mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine.8 A total of 3 643 918 persons were enrolled in v-safe and completed at least 1 health survey within 7 days following their first vaccine dose; 1 920 872 v-safe participants reported receiving a second vaccine dose and completed at least 1 daily health survey within 7 days following the second dose. Solicited local and systemic reactions during days 0 to 7 after each dose were assessed.

Most v-safe participants reported an injection site reaction (dose 1: 70.0%; dose 2: 75.2%) or a systemic reaction (dose 1: 50.0%; dose 2: 69.4%) during days 0 to 7 after vaccination (Table). The most frequently reported solicited local and systemic reactions after the first dose of COVID-19 vaccine were injection site pain (67.8%), fatigue (30.9%), headache (25.9%), and myalgia (19.4%). Reactogenicity was substantially greater after the second dose for both vaccines, particularly for systemic reactions, including fatigue (53.9%), headache (46.7%), myalgia (44.0%), chills (31.3%), fever (29.5%), and joint pain (25.6%).Table.  Solicited Local and Systemic Reactionsa to mRNA-Based COVID-19 Vaccines Reported 0 to 7 Days After Vaccination—Centers for Disease Control and Prevention V-safe Surveillance System, December 14, 2020, to February 28, 2021 View LargeDownload

Solicited Local and Systemic Reactionsa to mRNA-Based COVID-19 Vaccines Reported 0 to 7 Days After Vaccination—Centers for Disease Control and Prevention V-safe Surveillance System, December 14, 2020, to February 28, 2021

A greater percentage of participants who received the Moderna vaccine, compared with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, reported reactogenicity; this pattern was more pronounced after the second dose (Table). When stratified by age (<65 vs ≥65 years), differences in reactogenicity by vaccine remained consistent with overall findings (data not shown). Local and systemic reactions were less commonly reported by v-safe participants 65 years and older compared with those younger than 65 years, but greater reactogenicity after the second dose was observed for both age groups (eFigure in the Supplement). For both doses of both vaccines, the percentage of v-safe participants who reported local and systemic reactions was highest on day 1 after vaccination and declined markedly through day 7.

For More Information: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2778441

How to combat ‘COVID fatigue’: Medical experts on what works — and doesn’t

Authors: Meredith Deliso

“Throughout pandemics, the psychological footprint is often way bigger than the medical footprint,” Dr. Claude Mellins, a medical psychologist who co-leads a pandemic initiative called CopeColumbia for the Columbia University Irving Medical Center community, told ABC News.

One of the challenges is the pandemic makes it hard to turn to our normal coping strategies, such as being with people and engaging in fun activities, said Mellins, a professor of medical psychology in the Psychiatry Department at Columbia University Irving Medical Center and the Sociomedical Sciences Department at the Mailman School of Public Health.

People are “feeling unbelievably anxious of the uncertainty, and so they don’t want to be isolated, and they don’t want to do some of the things that we need to be there,” she added.

In the face of COVID fatigue, people are continually urged to not let their guard down. But how can public health officials accomplish this?

For More Information: https://abcnews.go.com/Health/combat-covid-fatigue-medical-experts-works/story?id=73861469

Chronic Fatigue May Be Long-Term Effect of COVID

Authors: Carolyn Crist

A large number of people who contract the coronavirus don’t fully recover in a few weeks, and many of them are experiencing chronic fatigue.

More than a third of those who have tested positive for COVID-19 and have symptoms don’t feel like they’re back to normal, even weeks later, according to a new CDC report.

“COVID-19 can result in prolonged illness, even among young adults without underlying chronic medical conditions,” the CDC COVID-19 Response Team wrote.

About 35% of people surveyed for the study said they weren’t back to their “usual state of health,” according to the report. Among those between ages 18-34 without prior chronic medical conditions, one in five said they hadn’t completely recovered.

Scientists are beginning to study whether the coronavirus may create post-viral issues such as myalgic encephalomyelitis, which is also known as chronic fatigue syndrome. Common symptoms include brain fog, fatigue, pain, immune issues, and malaise after exercise.

Those who are experiencing long-term symptoms after contracting the coronavirus — called the “COVID long-haulers” — are beginning to talk about the months-long issues they’ve had, according to CNN.

Tens of thousands of people have joined online support groups on social media, private chat channels and special interest websites, where they can talk about their symptoms and what to do as they recover.

For More Information: https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20200809/chronic-fatigue-may-be-long-term-effect-of-covid