Study Finds Teenage Boys Six Times More Likely To Suffer Heart Problems From Vaccine Than Be Hospitalized by COVID

Authors; Paul Joseph Watson via Summit News,

Research conducted by the University of California has found that teenage boys are six times more likely to suffer from heart problems caused by the COVID-19 vaccine than to be hospitalized as a result of COVID-19 itself.

“A team led by Dr Tracy Hoeg at the University of California investigated the rate of cardiac myocarditis – heart inflammation – and chest pain in children aged 12-17 following their second dose of the vaccine,” reports the Telegraph.

“They then compared this with the likelihood of children needing hospital treatment owing to Covid-19, at times of low, moderate and high rates of hospitalisation.”

Researchers found that the risk of heart complications for boys aged 12-15 following the vaccine was 162.2 per million, which was the highest out of all the groups they looked at.

This compares to the risk of a healthy boy being hospitalized as a result of a COVID infection, which is around 26.7 per million, meaning the risk they face from the vaccine is 6.1 times higher.

Even during high risk rates of COVID, such as in January this year, the threat posed by the vaccine is 4.3 times higher, while during low risk rates, the risk of teenage boys suffering a “cardiac adverse event” from the vaccine is a whopping 22.8 times higher.

The research data was based on a study of adverse reactions suffered by teens between January and June this year.

In a sane world, such data should represent the nail in the coffin for the argument that teenagers and children should be mandated to take the coronavirus vaccine, but it obviously won’t.

In the UK, the government is pushing to vaccinate 12-15-year-olds, even without parental consent, despite the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) advising against it.

Meanwhile, in America, Los Angeles County school officials voted unanimously to mandate COVID shots for all

Clinical determinants of the severity of COVID-19: A systematic review and meta-analysis

PLOS

Abstract

Objective


We aimed to systematically identify the possible risk factors responsible for severe cases.


Methods

We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of science and Cochrane Library for epidemiological studies of confirmed COVID-19, which include information about clinical characteristics and severity of patients’ disease. We analyzed the potential associations between clinical characteristics and severe cases.


Results

We identified a total of 41 eligible studies including 21060 patients with COVID-19. Severe cases were potentially associated with advanced age (Standard Mean Difference (SMD) = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.34–2.12), male gender (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.51, 95% CI:1.33–1.71), obesity (OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.44–2.46), history of smoking (OR = 1.40, 95% CI:1.06–1.85), hypertension (OR = 2.42, 95% CI: 2.03–2.88), diabetes (OR = 2.40, 95% CI: 1.98–2.91), coronary heart disease (OR: 2.87, 95% CI: 2.22–3.71), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (OR = 2.97, 95% CI: 1.63–5.41), cerebrovascular disease (OR = 2.47, 95% CI: 1.54–3.97), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR = 2.88, 95% CI: 1.89–4.38), malignancy (OR = 2.60, 95% CI: 2.00–3.40), and chronic liver disease (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.06–2.17). Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (OR = 39.59, 95% CI: 19.99–78.41), shock (OR = 21.50, 95% CI: 10.49–44.06) and acute kidney injury (AKI) (OR = 8.84, 95% CI: 4.34–18.00) were most likely to prevent recovery. In summary, patients with severe conditions had a higher rate of comorbidities and complications than patients with non-severe conditions.

Conclusion

Patients who were male, with advanced age, obesity, a history of smoking, hypertension, diabetes, malignancy, coronary heart disease, hypertension, chronic liver disease, COPD, or CKD are more likely to develop severe COVID-19 symptoms. ARDS, shock and AKI were thought to be the main hinderances to recovery.

For More Information: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0250602

Histopathological observations in COVID-19: a systematic review

  1. Authors: Vishwajit Deshmukh1, Rohini Motwani, Ashutosh Kumar3, Chiman Kumari4, Khursheed Raza5
  2. Correspondence to Dr Rohini Motwani, Department of Anatomy, ESIC Medical College and Hospital, Sanathnagar, Hyderabad, Telangana, India; rohinimotwani@gmail.com

Abstract

Background Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) has caused a great global threat to public health. The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared COVID-19 disease as a pandemic, affecting the human respiratory and other body systems, which urgently demands for better understanding of COVID-19 histopathogenesis.

Objective Data on pathological changes in different organs are still scarce, thus we aim to review and summarise the latest histopathological changes in different organs observed after autopsy of COVID-19 cases.

Materials and methods Over the period of 3 months, authors performed vast review of the articles. The search engines included were PubMed, Medline (EBSCO & Ovid), Google Scholar, Science Direct, Scopus and Bio-Medical. Search terms used were ‘Histopathology in COVID-19’, ‘COVID-19’, ‘Pathological changes in different organs in COVID-19’ or ‘SARS-CoV-2’. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) 2009 guidelines were used for review writing.

Result We identified various articles related to the histopathology of various organs in COVID-19 positive patients. Overall, 45 articles were identified as full articles to be included in our study. Histopathological findings observed are summarised according to the systems involved.

Conclusion Although COVID-19 mainly affects respiratory and immune systems, but other systems like cardiovascular, urinary, gastrointestinal tract, reproductive system, nervous system and integumentary system are not spared, especially in elderly cases and those with comorbidity. This review would help clinicians and researchers to understand the tissue pathology, which can help in better planning of the management and avoiding future risks.

This article is made freely available for use in accordance with BMJ’s website terms and conditions for the duration of the covid-19 pandemic or until otherwise determined by BMJ. You may use, download and print the article for any lawful, non-commercial purpose (including text and data mining) provided that all copyright notices and trade marks are retained.

For More Information: https://jcp.bmj.com/content/74/2/76

COVID-19: an update and cardiac involvement

Authors: Nizar R. Alwaqfi & Khalid S. Ibrahim 

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects host cells through angiotensin converting enzyme 2 receptors, leading to coronavirus disease (COVID-19)-related pneumonia, and also causing acute cardiac injury and chronic damage to the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this review is primarily reviewing the COVID-19 disease, including pathogen, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment with particular attention to cardiovascular involvement based on the current evidence. COVID-19 remains a threat to global public health. The associated extra-pulmonary manifestations and their prolonged consequences are frequently overlooked. Pre-existing cardiovascular disease or acute cardiac complications may contribute to adverse early clinical outcome. At the moment, there is no specific treatment for COVID-19, but multiple randomized controlled trials (RCT) are being conducted. New supportive therapies are being evaluated with promising results.

Background

In the last two decades the family coronaviruses (CoVs) was responsible for two severe epidemics of zoonotic origin. In 2003 a mysterious pneumonia, originated from southeast China, caused by a new CoV and was named severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV), it infected more than 8000 with a mortality rate around 10–15% with no available proper treatment or vaccination. Then emergence of another outbreak in 2012 in the Middle East of a novel CoV called Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV), it infected 857 cases with 35% mortality rate [1,2,3].

In late December 2019, an outbreak of a mysterious pneumonia happened in a seafood wholesale wet market, the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market, in Wuhan, Hubei, China [45]. The underlying causative agent of this outbreak was identified as a novel coronavirus, that was named severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the disease related to it as CoV disease 2019 (COVID-19) by the World Health Organization (WHO). Later, WHO named this pathogenic virus for 2019-nCoV [67]. The market was closed on 1 January 2020 [5]. SARS-CoV-2 genetic sequence was shared publicly on 11–12 January, it is an enveloped virus with a genetic material made up of a positive–sense single–stranded RNA [58]. On march 11, 2020 WHO declared COVID-19 a pandemic disease and by May 12, 2020 the virus has spread to more than 200 countries worldwide with more than 4 million cases and more than 283 thousand deaths [5]. Till now, all available evidence for COVID-19 suggests that SARS-CoV-2 has a zoonotic origin in bats and not a laboratory construct [5].

Many literature reported the clinical features, virology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and radiology of COVID-19, but the comprehensive review is few. And although COVID-19 is predominantly a respiratory disease, some patients develop severe cardiovascular disease [1]. In addition, patients with underlying cardiovascular disease might have an increased risk of mortality [1]. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current literature on COVID-19 disease, including pathogen, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment based on the current evidence, with emphasis on understanding the mechanisms of cardiac involvement, cardiac complications, so that treatment of these patients can be timely and effective and mortality reduced.

For More Information: https://cardiothoracicsurgery.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13019-020-01299-5