Adaptive immunity to SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19

Authors: Alessandro Sette1,2 and Shane Crotty1,2,* 1Center for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research, La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI), La Jolla, CA 92037, USA
2Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Public Health, University of California, San Diego (UCSD), La Jolla, CA
92037, USA

SUMMARY
The adaptive immune system is important for control of most viral infections. The three fundamental components of the adaptive immune system are B cells (the source of antibodies), CD4+ T cells, and CD8+ T cells. The armamentarium of B cells, CD4+ T cells, and CD8+ T cells has differing roles in different viral infections and in vaccines, and thus it is critical to directly study adaptive immunity to SARS-CoV-2 to understand COVID-19. Knowledge is now available on relationships between antigen-specific immune responses and SARS-CoV-2 infection. Although more studies are needed, a picture has begun to emerge that reveals that CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and neutralizing antibodies all contribute to control of SARS-CoV-2 in both
non-hospitalized and hospitalized cases of COVID-19. The specific functions and kinetics of these adaptive immune responses are discussed, as well as their interplay with innate immunity and implications for COVID19 vaccines and immune memory against re-infection.


INTRODUCTION


Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the novel human pathogen severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) (Hu et al., 2020), is a serious disease that has resulted in widespread global morbidity and mortality.


Our understanding of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 has rapidly evolved during 2020. As of December 2020, the United States has experienced >300,000 deaths, winter cases are rising exceptionally fast, and the first interim phase 3 vaccine trial results have been reported. The scientific advances in understanding SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 have been extraordinarily rapid and broad, by any metric, which is an amazing testament to the commitment, creativity, collaboration, and expertise of the international scientific community, both in academia and industry, under extremely challenging conditions. This article will review our current understanding of the immunology of COVID-19, with a primary focus on adaptive immunity.


The immune system is broadly divided into the innate immune system and the adaptive immune system. Although the adaptive and innate immune systems are linked in important and powerful ways, they each consist of different cell types with different jobs.


The adaptive immune system consists of three major cell types: B cells, CD4+ T cells, and CD8+ T cells (Figure 1). B cells produce antibodies. CD4+ T cells possess a range of helper and effector functionalities. CD8+ T cells kill infected cells. Given that adaptive immune responses are important for the control and clearance of almost all viral infections that cause disease in humans, and adaptive immune responses and immune memory are central to the success of all vaccines, it is critical to understand adaptive responses to SARS-CoV-2.

ONE INTEGRATED MODEL OF IMMUNE RESPONSES TO SARS-CoV-2

This review first presents a working model of immune responses to SARS-CoV-2, to provide an overarching context, and then the review explores individual compartments and immunological facets of adaptive immunity to SARS-CoV-2 in greater detail. Importantly, this is an evolving model and should not be accepted as definitive; instead, it provides a reference point for interpreting much of the available data in the literature and to identify knowledge gaps that may provide directions for future studies.

For More Information: https://www.cell.com/cell/pdfExtended/S0092-8674(21)00007-6

Pre-existing immunity to SARS-CoV-2: the knowns and unknowns

Authors: Alessandro Sette 1 2Shane Crotty 3 4

Abstract

T cell reactivity against SARS-CoV-2 was observed in unexposed people; however, the source and clinical relevance of the reactivity remains unknown. It is speculated that this reflects T cell memory to circulating ‘common cold’ coronaviruses. It will be important to define specificities of these T cells and assess their association with COVID-19 disease severity and vaccine responses.

As data start to accumulate on the detection and characterization of SARS-CoV-2 T cell responses in humans, a surprising finding has been reported: lymphocytes from 20–50% of unexposed donors display significant reactivity to SARS-CoV-2 antigen peptide pools1,2,3,4.

In a study by Grifoni et al.1, reactivity was detected in 50% of donor blood samples obtained in the USA between 2015 and 2018, before SARS-CoV-2 appeared in the human population. T cell reactivity was highest against proteins other than the coronavirus spike protein, but T cell reactivity was also detected against spike. The SARS-CoV-2 T cell reactivity was mostly associated with CD4+ T cells, with a smaller contribution by CD8+ T cells1. Similarly, in a study of blood donors in the Netherlands, Weiskopf et al.2 detected CD4+ T cell reactivity against SARS-CoV-2 spike peptides in 1 of 10 unexposed subjects and against SARS-CoV-2 non-spike peptides in 2 of 10 unexposed subjects. CD8+ T cell reactivity was observed in 1 of 10 unexposed donors. In a third study, from Germany, Braun et al.3 reported positive T cell responses against spike peptides in 34% of SARS-CoV-2 seronegative healthy donors. Finally, a study of individuals in Singapore, by Le Bert et al.4, reported T cell responses to nucleocapsid protein nsp7 or nsp13 in 50% of subjects with no history of SARS, COVID-19, or contact with patients with SARS or COVID-19. A study by Meckiff using samples from the UK also detected reactivity in unexposed subjects5. Taken together, five studies report evidence of pre-existing T cells that recognize SARS-CoV-2 in a significant fraction of people from diverse geographical locations.

These early reports demonstrate that substantial T cell reactivity exists in many unexposed people; nevertheless, data have not yet demonstrated the source of the T cells or whether they are memory T cells. It has been speculated that the SARS-CoV-2-specific T cells in unexposed individuals might originate from memory T cells derived from exposure to ‘common cold’ coronaviruses (CCCs), such as HCoV-OC43, HCoV-HKU1, HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E, which widely circulate in the human population and are responsible for mild self-limiting respiratory symptoms. More than 90% of the human population is seropositive for at least three of the CCCs6. Thiel and colleagues3 reported that the T cell reactivity was highest against a pool of SARS-CoV-2 spike peptides that had homology to CCCs.

What are the implications of these observations? The potential for pre-existing crossreactivity against COVID-19 in a fraction of the human population has led to extensive speculation. Pre-existing T cell immunity to SARS-CoV-2 could be relevant because it could influence COVID-19 disease severity. It is plausible that people with a high level of pre-existing memory CD4+ T cells that recognize SARS-CoV-2 could mount a faster and stronger immune response upon exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and thereby limit disease severity. Memory T follicular helper (TFH) CD4+ T cells could potentially facilitate an increased and more rapid neutralizing antibody response against SARS-CoV-2. Memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells might also facilitate direct antiviral immunity in the lungs and nasopharynx early after exposure, in keeping with our understanding of antiviral CD4+ T cells in lungs against the related SARS-CoV7 and our general understanding of the value of memory CD8+ T cells in protection from viral infections. Large studies in which pre-existing immunity is measured and correlated with prospective infection and disease severity could address the possible role of pre-existing T cell memory against SARS-CoV-2.

For More Information: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41577-020-0389-z

Use of adenovirus type-5 vectored vaccines: a cautionary tale

Authors: The Lancet

We are writing to express concern about the use of a recombinant adenovirus type-5 (Ad5) vector for a COVID-19 phase 1 vaccine study,1 and subsequent advanced trials. Over a decade ago, we completed the Step and Phambili phase 2b studies that evaluated an Ad5 vectored HIV-1 vaccine administered in three immunizations for efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition.23 Both international studies found an increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition among vaccinated men.24 The Step trial found that men who were Ad5 seropositive and uncircumcised on entry into the trial were at elevated risk of HIV-1 acquisition during the first 18 months of follow-up.5 The hazard ratios were particularly high among men who were uncircumcised and Ad5 seropositive, and who reported unprotected insertive anal sex with a partner who was HIV-1 seropositive or had unknown serostatus at baseline, suggesting the potential for increased risk of penile acquisition of HIV-1. Importantly for considering the potential use of Ad5 vectors for COVID-19 infection, a similar increased risk of HIV infection was also observed in heterosexual men who enrolled in the Phambili study.4 This effect appeared to persist over time. Both studies involved an Ad5 construct that did not have the HIV-1 envelope. In another HIV study, done only in men who were Ad5 seronegative and circumcised, a DNA prime followed by an Ad5 vector were used, in which both constructs contained the HIV-1 envelope.6 No increased risk of HIV infection was noted. A consensus conference about Ad5 vectors held in 2013 and sponsored by the National Institutes of Health indicated the most probable explanation for these differences related to the potential counterbalancing effects of envelope immune responses in mitigating the effects of the Ad5 vector on HIV-1 acquisition.7 The conclusion of this consensus conference warned that non-HIV vaccine trials that used similar vectors in areas of high HIV prevalence could lead to an increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition in the vaccinated population. The increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition appeared to be limited to men; a similar increase in risk was not seen in women in the Phambili trial.4Several follow-up studies suggested the potential mechanism for this increased susceptibility to HIV infection among men. The vaccine was highly immunogenic in the induction of HIV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells; however, there was no difference in the frequency of T-cell responses after vaccination in men who did and did not later become infected with HIV in the Step Study.8 These findings suggest that immune responses induced by the HIV-specific vaccine were not the mechanism of increased acquisition. Participants with high frequencies of preimmunisation Ad5-specific T cells were associated with a decreased magnitude of HIV-specific CD4 responses and recipients of the vaccine had a decreased breadth of HIV-specific CD8 responses,9 suggesting that pre-existing Ad5 immunity might dampen desired vaccine-induced responses. 

For More Information: https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/home

What is the role of T cells in COVID-19 infection? Why immunity is about more than antibodies

Summary

  • CD4+ T cells help B cells to produce antibodies and help CD8+ T cells to kill virus-infected cells
  • One of the dominant cytokines produced by T cells is interferon gamma, a key player in controlling viral infection – see also [41]
  • Lymphopenia is a main feature of COVID-19 infection, affecting CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and B cells, and is more pronounced in severely ill patients
  • T cell responses in severely ill patients may be impaired, over-activated, or inappropriate, and further research is required to elucidate this and inform treatment strategies
  • There is some evidence of cross-reactivity with seasonal/endemic coronaviruses
  • Emerging studies suggest that all or a majority of people with COVID-19 develop a strong and broad T cell response, both CD4 and CD8, and some have a memory phenotype, which bodes well for potential longer-term immunity
  • Understanding the roles of different subsets of T cells in protection or pathogenesis is crucial for preventing and treating COVID-19

For More Information: https://www.cebm.net/covid-19/what-is-the-role-of-t-cells-in-covid-19-infection-why-immunity-is-about-more-than-antibodies/