Something Really Strange Is Happening At Hospitals All Over America

Authors: Authored by Michael Snyder via TheMostImportantNews.com, TURSDAY, NOV 04, 2021 – 05:11

In a year that has been filled with so many mysteries already, I have another very odd one to share with you.  Emergency rooms are filled to overflowing all over America, and nobody can seem to explain why this is happening.  Right now, the number of new COVID cases in the United States each day is less than half of what it was just a couple of months ago.  That is really good news, and many believe that this is a sign that the pandemic is fading.  Let us hope that is true.  With less people catching the virus, you would think that would mean that our emergency rooms should be emptying out, but the opposite is actually happening.  All across the country, emergency rooms are absolutely packed, and in many cases we are seeing seriously ill patients being cared for in the hallways because all of the ER rooms are already full.

Let me give you an example of what I am talking about.  The following comes from an article entitled “ERs Are Swamped With Seriously Ill Patients, Although Many Don’t Have Covid”

Inside the emergency department at Sparrow Hospital in Lansing, Michigan, staff members are struggling to care for patients showing up much sicker than they’ve ever seen.

Tiffani Dusang, the ER’s nursing director, practically vibrates with pent-up anxiety, looking at patients lying on a long line of stretchers pushed up against the beige walls of the hospital hallways. “It’s hard to watch,” she said in a warm Texas twang.

But there’s nothing she can do. The ER’s 72 rooms are already filled.

Can anyone explain why this is happening?

If the number of COVID cases was starting to spike again, it would make sense for emergency rooms to be overflowing.

But at this particular hospital in Michigan, we are being told that some of the main things that are being treated include “abdominal pain”, “respiratory problems”, “blood clots” and “heart conditions”

Months of treatment delays have exacerbated chronic conditions and worsened symptoms. Doctors and nurses say the severity of illness ranges widely and includes abdominal pain, respiratory problems, blood clots, heart conditions and suicide attempts, among other conditions.

That mention of “heart conditions” immediately got my attention, because I have been seeing this so much in the news recently.

For instance, a high school senior in Pennsylvania just dropped dead from “a sudden cardiac incident”

The high school soccer manager ‘greatly enjoyed’ his team’s championship victory Saturday. Later that evening, he was dead.

Now, late student Blake Barklage’s high school is mourning his untimely death. As 6ABC in Philly reports, the tragedy occurred at La Salle College High School in Montgomery County, Pa.

In a letter to parents, the school announced that the senior died after ‘a sudden cardiac incident’ Saturday night.

Elsewhere in the same state, an otherwise healthy 12-year-old boy just suddenly died because of an issue with his coronary artery…

As family and friends grieve, the cause of death is in for a 12-year-old taken way too soon while warming up for school basketball practice.

As TribLive in Pittsburgh reports, Jayson Kidd, 12, of Bridgeville, Pa., died of natural causes involving his coronary artery, according to the Allegheny County Medical Examiner’s Office.

Heart problems kill elderly people all the time, but it is odd that so many healthy young people have been having these problems.

Over the weekend, Barcelona striker Sergio Aguero suddenly collapsed on the pitch during a match.

He was later diagnosed with “a cardiac arrhythmia”

Sergio “Kun” Aguero, a striker for the Barcelona soccer team, has been diagnosed with a cardiac arrhythmia after collapsing during Saturday’s match against Alaves.

The 33-year-old Argentinian was examined by medical staff at the stadium before being taken to a nearby hospital where he is still waiting to undergo further examination.

Just two days later, a match in Norway was brought to a screeching halt after a player experienced “cardiac arrest” right in the middle of a match…

A football match in Norway’s second division was halted on Monday after Icelandic midfielder Emil Pálsson suffered a cardiac arrest during play.

The 28-year-old Sogndal player suffered the attack as the game against Stjordals-Blink entered the 12th minute, his club said in a statement.

I have been seeing so many stories like this.

So why are so many young people suddenly having such serious problems with their hearts?

Can anyone out there explain this to me?

What Does COVID Do to Your Blood?

Authors: Panagis Galiatsatos, M.D., M.H.S., Robert Brodsky, M.D.

COVID-19 is a very complex illness. The coronavirus that causes COVID-19 attacks the body in many different ways, ranging from mild to life threatening. Different organs and tissues of the body can be affected, including the blood.

Robert Brodsky, a blood specialist who directs the Division of Hematology, and Panagis Galiatsatos, a specialist in lung diseases and critical care medicine, talk about blood problems linked to SARS-CoV-2 — the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 — and what you should know.

Coronavirus Blood Clots

Blood clots can cause problems ranging from mild to life threatening. If a clot blocks blood flow in a vein or artery, the tissue normally nourished by that blood vessel can be deprived of oxygen, and cells in that area can die.

Some people infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop abnormal blood clotting. “In some people with COVID-19, we’re seeing a massive inflammatory response, the cytokine storm that raises clotting factors in the blood,” says Galiatsatos, who treats patients with COVID-19.

“We are seeing more blood clots in the lungs (pulmonary embolism), legs (deep vein thrombosis) and elsewhere,” he says.

Brodsky notes that other serious illnesses, especially ones that cause inflammation, are associated with blood clots. Research is still exploring if the blood clots seen in severe cases of COVID-19 are unique in some way. 

The Impact of Coronavirus Blood Clots Throughout the Body

In addition to the lungs, blood clots, including those associated with COVID-19, can also harm:

The nervous system. Blood clots in the arteries leading to the brain can cause a stroke. Some previously young, healthy people who have developed COVID-19 have suffered strokes, possibly due to abnormal blood clotting.

The kidneys. Clogging of blood vessels in the kidney with blood clots can lead to kidney failure. It can also complicate dialysis if the clots clog the filter of the machine designed to remove impurities in the blood.

Peripheral blood vessels and “COVID toe.” Small blood clots can become lodged in tiny blood vessels. When this happens close to the skin, it can result in a rash. Some people who test positive for COVID-19 develop tiny blood clots that cause reddish or purple areas on the toes, which can itch or be painful. Sometimes called COVID toe, the rash resembles frostbite.

For More Information: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/what-does-covid-do-to-your-blood

Platelets Promote Thromboinflammation in SARS-CoV-2 Pneumonia

Authors: Francesco TausGianluca SalvagnoStefania CanèCristiano FavaFulvia MazzaferriElena CarraraVarvara PetrovaRoza Maria BarouniFrancesco DimaAndrea DalbeniSimone Romano,

Abstract

Objective:

Pulmonary thrombosis is observed in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pneumonia. Aim was to investigate whether subpopulations of platelets were programmed to procoagulant and inflammatory activities in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with pneumonia, without comorbidities predisposing to thromboembolism.

For More Information: https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/ATVBAHA.120.315175

Dr. Charles Hoffe issues Vaccine warning… Deep dive on endothelial damage to blood vessels…

Author: Dr. Charles Hoffe

in a Coronavirus, that spike protein becomes part of the viral capsule. In other words, the cell wall around the virus, called the viral capsule. But it’s not in the virus. It’s in your cells. So it therefore becomes part of the cell wall of your vascular endothelium. Which means that these cells that line your blood vessels, which are supposed to be smooth so that blood flows smoothly, now have these little spikey bits sticking out.

So it is absolutely inevitable that blood clots will form. Because your blood platelets circulate around in your blood vessels. And the purpose of blood platelets is to detect a damaged vessel and block that vessel to stop bleeding. So when the platelet comes through the capillary, it suddenly hits all these all these Covid spikes that are jutting into the inside of the vessel, it is absolutely inevitable that a blood clot will form to block that vessel. That’s how platelets work.

For More Information: https://citizenfreepress.com/breaking/dr-charles-hoffe-issues-vaccine-warning/

SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein Impairs Endothelial Function via Downregulation of ACE 2

Authors: Yuyang LeiJiao ZhangCara R. SchiavonMing HeLili ChenHui ShenYichi ZhangQian YinYoshitake ChoLeonardo AndradeGerald S. ShadelMark HepokoskiTing LeiHongliang WangJin ZhangJason X., et. al.

SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) infection relies on the binding of S protein (Sprotein (Spike glycoprotein) to ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) 2 in the host cells. Vascular endothelium can be infected by SARS-CoV-2,1 which triggers mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and glycolytic shift.2 Paradoxically, ACE2 is protective in the cardiovascular system, and SARS-CoV-1 S protein promotes lung injury by decreasing the level of ACE2 in the infected lungs.3 In the current study, we show that S protein alone can damage vascular endothelial cells (ECs) by downregulating ACE2 and consequently inhibiting mitochondrial function.

For More Information: https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.121.318902

Clots, Strokes and Rashes: Is COVID a Disease of the Blood Vessels?

Authors: Will Stone

Whether it’s strange rashes on the toes or blood clots in the brain, the widespread ravages of COVID-19 have increasingly led researchers to focus on how the novel coronavirus sabotages blood vessels.

As scientists have come to know the disease better, they have homed in on the vascular system — the body’s network of arteries, veins and capillaries, stretching more than 60,000 miles — to understand this wide-ranging disease and to find treatments that can stymie its most pernicious effects.

Some of the earliest insights into how COVID-19 can act like a vascular disease came from studying the aftermath of the most serious infections. Those reveal that the virus warps a critical piece of our vascular infrastructure: the single layer of cells lining the inside of every blood vessel, known as the endothelial cells or simply the endothelium.

For More Information: https://khn.org/news/clots-strokes-and-rashes-is-covid-a-disease-of-the-blood-vessels/

The Thorny Problem Of COVID-19 Vaccines And Spike Proteins

Authors: W. Glen Pyle

Almost since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, a piece of the SARS-CoV2 virus called the “spike protein” has drawn interest from researchers and healthcare professionals.

New research by Yuyang Lei and colleagues published in the journal Circulation Research sheds new light on how the spike protein might play a critical role in the widespread damage caused by SARS-CoV2, and offers insight into treating the complications of COVID-19.

Vaccine skeptics have seized on the study to cast doubt on the safety of vaccines. But a review of the study’s findings shows that the concerns raised by vaccine doubters are much ado about nothing.

The Study

The vascular endothelium is an important player in the illness and death associated with COVID-19. The endothelium is a system of cells that line and protect the inside of blood vessels. SARS-CoV2 injures the endothelium leading to blood clots, heart attack, pulmonary embolism, and stroke. Despite the established link between COVID-19 and these cardiovascular complications, the mechanism by which they develop is unknown.

Researchers from Jiaotong University; the University of California, San Diego; and the Salk Institute used a pseudovirus coated with spike protein to investigate the effects of the viral protein on endothelial cells. Pseudoviruses – which were first developed over 50 years ago – contain the outer shell of the virus, but they lack the viral genes needed to reproduce.

Hamsters treated with the spike protein coated pseudovirus showed lung damage similar to that seen in humans infected with SARS-CoV2. When researchers added pseudovirus to cultured endothelial cells they found that the mitochondria inside the cells were injured. Since mitochondria are responsible for providing energy to cells, their dysfunction can cause cell death.

When isolated pulmonary arteries were exposed to the spike protein carrying pseudovirus there was some disruption in the ability of the blood vessels to dilate. The decreased ability to expand blood vessels that serve the lungs could impair the ability of the body to take up oxygen from lungs that are damaged by the virus.

The novelty of this study was the discovery that the spike protein itself causes damage, and that the pathway triggered by the spike protein could explain the widespread cardiovascular complications that develop in COVID-19 patients.

For More Information: https://www.science20.com/w_glen_pyle/the_thorny_problem_of_covid19_vaccines_and_spike_proteins-254373

Evidence Shows that COVID-19 Attacks Blood Vessels

Authors: Carolyn Crist

As researchers learn more about COVID-19, they’ve seen reports from patients about unusual rashes, blood clots, and strokes, which could all be linked to damaged blood vessels.

Scientists are now looking at the vascular system, which includes arteries, veins, and capillaries, to monitor the various ways that the coronavirus attacks the body, according to NPR.

In particular, they’ve found that the virus seems to attack the endothelium, or the single layer of cells that line the inside of blood vessels. These cells prevent clotting, control blood pressure, and protect the body from invading pathogens.

“When the virus damages the inside of the blood vessel and shreds the lining, that’s like the ice after a hockey game,” William Li, a vascular biologist at the Angiogenesis Foundation, told NPR.

Li and a group of international researchers published a study this July that found lung tissue damage in COVID-19 patients. As compared with patients who died from the flu, the lung tissue of coronavirus patients had nine times as many small blood clots. They also saw what’s classified as “severe endothelial injury.”

“The surprise was that this respiratory virus makes a beeline for the cells lining blood vessels, filling them up like a gumball machine and shredding the cell from the inside out,” Li says. “We found blood vessels are blocked and blood clots are forming because of that lining damage.”

For More Information: https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20201109/evidence-shows-that-covid-19-attacks-blood-vessels

COVID-19 is, in the end, an endothelial disease

Authors: Peter LibbyThomas Lüscher

The vascular endothelium provides the crucial interface between the blood compartment and tissues, and displays a series of remarkable properties that normally maintain homeostasis. This tightly regulated palette of functions includes control of haemostasis, fibrinolysis, vasomotion, inflammation, oxidative stress, vascular permeability, and structure. While these functions participate in the moment-to-moment regulation of the circulation and coordinate many host defence mechanisms, they can also contribute to disease when their usually homeostatic and defensive functions over-reach and turn against the host. SARS-CoV-2, the aetiological agent of COVID-19, causes the current pandemic. It produces protean manifestations ranging from head to toe, wreaking seemingly indiscriminate havoc on multiple organ systems including the lungs, heart, brain, kidney, and vasculature. This essay explores the hypothesis that COVID-19, particularly in the later complicated stages, represents an endothelial disease. Cytokines, protein pro-inflammatory mediators, serve as key danger signals that shift endothelial functions from the homeostatic into the defensive mode. The endgame of COVID-19 usually involves a cytokine storm, a phlogistic phenomenon fed by well-understood positive feedback loops that govern cytokine production and overwhelm counter-regulatory mechanisms. The concept of COVID-19 as an endothelial disease provides a unifying pathophysiological picture of this raging infection, and also provides a framework for a rational treatment strategy at a time when we possess an indeed modest evidence base to guide our therapeutic attempts to confront this novel pandemic.

For More Information: https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/41/32/3038/5901158

COVID-19 Vasculopathy: Mounting Evidence for an Indirect Mechanism of Endothelial Injury

Authors: Roberto F. Nicosia,∗∗ Giovanni Ligresti, Nunzia Caporarello, Shreeram Akilesh, and Domenico Ribatti§

Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who are critically ill develop vascular complications characterized by thrombosis of small, medium, and large vessels. Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium due to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the COVID-19 vasculopathy. Although initial reports suggested that endothelial injury was caused directly by the virus, recent studies indicate that endothelial cells do not express angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, the receptor that SARS-CoV-2 uses to gain entry into cells, or express it at low levels and are resistant to the infection. These new findings, together with the observation that COVID-19 triggers a cytokine storm capable of injuring the endothelium and disrupting its antithrombogenic properties, favor an indirect mechanism of endothelial injury mediated locally by an augmented inflammatory reaction to infected nonendothelial cells, such as the bronchial and alveolar epithelium, and systemically by the excessive immune response to infection. Herein we review the vascular pathology of COVID-19 and critically discuss the potential mechanisms of endothelial injury in this disease.

For More Information: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8141344/